It's Time to Pray for Bitcoin, Says Veteran Crypto Analyst ...

HELP PLEASE MY FAMILY

Hello, dear and caring kind people! Peace and goodness in your home! Suppose that you are always accompanied by good luck and health for life. We have the following situation. We live in a small provincial town in the Republic of Belarus. Work for meager salaries does not allow to live more or less full life. We have 2 small children and we expect additions to the family. All 13 years of marriage, we live on a rented apartment. Very hard ... We would like to buy a small house to live. House to save with a salary of $ 200 a month - is unrealistic ... The pay for an apartment, a kindergarten and a school, dress, and eat the money - almost impossible. But life makes its own rules. Please help to buy a small house for our family in our city. On the big cities do not apply (although we would like) due to the fact that there is a house worth several times more expensive. We at least in my provincial town to purchase a roof over your head ... The cheapest is suitable for permanent residence will cost about 500 thousand Russian rubles. Please help to collect the necessary sum. All confirm our stay and all the information I can provide to you personally. Sberbank card number 4276 3801 2957 0243 (submit with a note "The Gift"). Tagging is necessary to ensure that our tax authorities did not show too many questions regarding the cash flow, this is tough. If you wish to send money via Western Union please write me an email and I will give you the necessary data. If you need additional details for the transfer - email me. Advance kowtow to everyone! May the Lord protect your nearest and dearest! To contact me, please use the email or mobile phone number (in the e-mail request). The Lord will reward your indifferent hundredfold! We will be in prayer to ask God to hear our cry of the soul and help our family. Take care of yourself and your loved ones! Do not blame yourself. Help if possible. Every donation makes our family a step closer to the dream. PS Please Do not ignore our appeal. And do not judge. After all, if each of you will amount at least 5 000, our dream has almost come true. One happy family in the world will be more thanks to your support. God bless you! Be happy! Help on - opportunities. If you have the opportunity to place my request on their pages on social networks, it is best that you make. We will pray to the Lord every day for your health and the health of your loved ones. Help, do a good deed. You will change our lives and destiny, just to help. Hope for understanding. Take care of yourself and your loved ones!
Friends! May the Lord protect all those who do not condemn, and without much discussion and conversations will provide financial support. Dear ones, if you need more details, contact me at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]) and I will try to create the necessary electronic wallet suitable for transfer of charitable payments. Who has the opportunity to share our request on their pages on social networks or to help create a fundraiser on kraudfandingovyh sites - low bow to you, please help. Sberbank card number 4276 3801 2957 0243 (submit with a note "The Gift"). For more details please contact me at the above e-mail. Health to you and your friends and family! Peaceful sky.

Please help with money to my family. We need $ 20,000 to solve all our life and financial problems. Can you send money via Western Union to the Republic of Belarus or to my Bitcoin e-wallet? Write your answer here by e-mail or my Facebook account: https://web.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100013767272048
submitted by Shepelevich to u/Shepelevich [link] [comments]

Liberating the cryptocurrency mining industry

The creation of virtual currencies, has really shown the level at which the world has advanced. Since Bitcoin opened the door for other crypto-currencies, a lot of them has flooded the market. This shows the use and the level of adoption that these virtual currencies are gaining globally. These crypto-currencies, (take Bitcoin for an example) are rapidly increasing in value, new coins are emerging into the crypto-currency market, in order to give the users, the best. All these are dependent on the mining industry.
THE MINING INDUSTRY
The crypto-currency mining industry is an industry which is tasked with sourcing for these crypto-currencies. So you see?, this industry plays a vital role in the crypto-currency world, as the crypto-currency values as well as the creation of new crypto-currencies, are based on the mining power of the crypto-currency miners. In fact, the role which the mining industry plays in the crypto-currency world cannot be overemphasized, so should be given the needed attention and support. Energy is one of the most important tools used in the mining industry, it is like the driving force of this industry, as mining requires a great amount of energy, to take place. So the worth of the crypto-currencies mined, is proportional to the energy level utilized. For coins like Bitcoin, with high worth, a whole lot of energy is used during mining. Another set of important tools, used in the mining industry, are the mining equipment. Crypto-currency, being a beneficial and recent trend, cannot be mined with outdated or crude equipment. In order to ensure efficiency and maximum output, highly sophisticated technologies and equipment are used in the mining industry. But the nagging challenge is the blockade which has surfaced in the mining industry.
THE BARRIERS IN THE MINING INDUSTRY
LACK OF CLEAN ENERGY SOURCE This has become a very big challenge in this industry, as the energy required for mining, is inefficient. The available energy which is gotten from fuel burning and fossils, actually result in disasters such as pollution and global warming, if it is continually used in mining. Sadly, the crypto-currency industry, which was supposed to revolutionize the world, is rapidly damaging it, due to it’s great need for energy.
EXPENSIVE AND INADEQUATE MINING EQUIPMENT This has been another setback in the mining industry, as there are inefficient technologies for mining, and the available ones are very expensive for crypto-currency miners. So generally, the crypto-currency mining industry has been rendered unproductive, thereby affecting the crypto-currency world, and the global financial system at large. But all these are now a thing of the past, because there is a lasting solution.
INTRODUCING DAGO, CRYPTO-CURRENCY MINING MADE EFFICIENT
Dago is indeed, the answer to the prayers of the mining industry. It is aimed at liberating crypto-currency mining, making it more profitable. Dago will solve the energy problem by adopting the photovoltaics and CSP-fresnel. This enables Dago to provide a green and pure energy, for the miners and other blockchain operations.Utilizing this sophisticated technology, renewable and adequate energy will be produced, at a very low cost, giving no room for the disasters caused by burning fuel.
That’s not all.
Dago does understand the need for pure and green energy, so it does not intend to waste the electricity it will produce. Rather, it will use it’s advanced electricity storage technology, to store the electricity produced in excess, which can then be used at night, or when the system is not producing electricity.
Wow!! this is really a great news for the crypto-currency mining industry. And Dago still has a lot more to offer
Dago will provide mining equipment, which will make crypto-currency mining, seamless and effective. With the right tools, a great output is guaranteed. So with Dago mining, the needs of the miners will be met, and mining which is characterized by safety and efficiency, will begin to take place at a very low cost,thereby ensuring profitability. Also, to ensure the safety of mined crypto-currencies, Dago will also develop a separate internal network, to store the crypto-currencies and fortify it against attacks by cyberpunk.
DAGO TOKEN
DAGO is an ERC-20 based utility token.It is the native currency of the Dago platform, and will be of great benefit to the investors, as they can hold the token, and get paid dividends at the end of every financial year.
In CONCLUSION
Dago mining has the interest of the crypto-currency industry at heart, so will ensure that everything needed to make the industry a beneficial one, is provided.
https://www.dago-mining.com/ico/
submitted by bolyus21 to ICOAnalysis [link] [comments]

Liberating the cryptocurrency mining industry


The creation of virtual currencies, has really shown the level at which the world has advanced. Since Bitcoin opened the door for other crypto-currencies, a lot of them has flooded the market. This shows the use and the level of adoption that these virtual currencies are gaining globally. These crypto-currencies, (take Bitcoin for an example) are rapidly increasing in value, new coins are emerging into the crypto-currency market, in order to give the users, the best. All these are dependent on the mining industry.
THE MINING INDUSTRY
The crypto-currency mining industry is an industry which is tasked with sourcing for these crypto-currencies. So you see?, this industry plays a vital role in the crypto-currency world, as the crypto-currency values as well as the creation of new crypto-currencies, are based on the mining power of the crypto-currency miners. In fact, the role which the mining industry plays in the crypto-currency world cannot be overemphasized, so should be given the needed attention and support. Energy is one of the most important tools used in the mining industry, it is like the driving force of this industry, as mining requires a great amount of energy, to take place. So the worth of the crypto-currencies mined, is proportional to the energy level utilized. For coins like Bitcoin, with high worth, a whole lot of energy is used during mining. Another set of important tools, used in the mining industry, are the mining equipment. Crypto-currency, being a beneficial and recent trend, cannot be mined with outdated or crude equipment. In order to ensure efficiency and maximum output, highly sophisticated technologies and equipment are used in the mining industry. But the nagging challenge is the blockade which has surfaced in the mining industry.
THE BARRIERS IN THE MINING INDUSTRY
LACK OF CLEAN ENERGY SOURCE This has become a very big challenge in this industry, as the energy required for mining, is inefficient. The available energy which is gotten from fuel burning and fossils, actually result in disasters such as pollution and global warming, if it is continually used in mining. Sadly, the crypto-currency industry, which was supposed to revolutionize the world, is rapidly damaging it, due to it’s great need for energy.
EXPENSIVE AND INADEQUATE MINING EQUIPMENT This has been another setback in the mining industry, as there are inefficient technologies for mining, and the available ones are very expensive for crypto-currency miners. So generally, the crypto-currency mining industry has been rendered unproductive, thereby affecting the crypto-currency world, and the global financial system at large. But all these are now a thing of the past, because there is a lasting solution.
INTRODUCING DAGO, CRYPTO-CURRENCY MINING MADE EFFICIENT
Dago is indeed, the answer to the prayers of the mining industry. It is aimed at liberating crypto-currency mining, making it more profitable. Dago will solve the energy problem by adopting the photovoltaics and CSP-fresnel. This enables Dago to provide a green and pure energy, for the miners and other blockchain operations.Utilizing this sophisticated technology, renewable and adequate energy will be produced, at a very low cost, giving no room for the disasters caused by burning fuel.
That’s not all.
Dago does understand the need for pure and green energy, so it does not intend to waste the electricity it will produce. Rather, it will use it’s advanced electricity storage technology, to store the electricity produced in excess, which can then be used at night, or when the system is not producing electricity.
Wow!! this is really a great news for the crypto-currency mining industry. And Dago still has a lot more to offer
Dago will provide mining equipment, which will make crypto-currency mining, seamless and effective. With the right tools, a great output is guaranteed. So with Dago mining, the needs of the miners will be met, and mining which is characterized by safety and efficiency, will begin to take place at a very low cost,thereby ensuring profitability. Also, to ensure the safety of mined crypto-currencies, Dago will also develop a separate internal network, to store the crypto-currencies and fortify it against attacks by cyberpunk.
DAGO TOKEN
DAGO is an ERC-20 based utility token.It is the native currency of the Dago platform, and will be of great benefit to the investors, as they can hold the token, and get paid dividends at the end of every financial year.
In CONCLUSION
Dago mining has the interest of the crypto-currency industry at heart, so will ensure that everything needed to make the industry a beneficial one, is provided.
https://www.dago-mining.com/ico/
submitted by bolyus21 to CryptocurrencyICOs [link] [comments]

Magic internet money

Like a lot of people my coworkers and I have been discussing the cryptocurrency boom, and swapping stories we've heard. You know the ones:
I thought that one a coworker told me today would be a good fit for this subreddit. Overall story is the same as I was told, just anonymised and posted with permission.
Involved:
$CW = my current co-worker
$SmallCo – A smallish business with <15 employees.
$Bossman for the boss of a $SmallCo
$Old_IT for the old IT guy that used to work at $SmallCo
$CW was brought into $SmallCo on an emergency contract basis, apparently due to $Old_IT being terminated for “performance reasons” before $SmallCo could find a new permanent IT guy. $CW quickly found out through office gossip that the performance had to do with some inappropriate behaviour involving a young office admin and a lot of alcohol, and avoiding a lawsuit.
$CW was tasked by $Bossman to ensure that there was “no way they could get hacked by $Old_IT” ($Bossman was apparently a good dude with zero technical skills).
“While you’re at it” said $Bossman, “fix what’s making that godawful sound in the closet.”
$CW set to work securing what he could - ensuring that all passwords (including admin) were changed site-wide, dealing with vendors and suppliers to to let them know $Old_IT was no longer allowed to make changes, changed the entry codes for doors to offices and server rooms, and just general security practices you do when you terminate a SysAdmin. Then $CW started the hardware audit.
(At this point $CW paused in his story - he’d heard tales of SysAdmins who set up automated scripts that would nuke all systems if admin passwords were changed, but hadn't considered this before his updates. Thankfully, none of those malicious scripts were found, but he says he was sweating bullets when he remembered after changing everything.)
What $CW did find instead was
The works. It was heaven.
The servers in the “server room” (in reality a closet but with proper ventilation) were clearly labelled with the server name, IP, and with the purpose (DB server, mail server, etc) and all with pretty awesome cableporn worthy management.
It took $CW barely two hours to make sure all the hardware matched the documentation.
Except ... for this one machine in the server room. A big sucker, an extra wide base that looked out of place compared to the sleek machines in the room. The specific unit was the one that $Bossman had pointed out, and it was indeed making a terrible racket. No asset labels, no server information, no documentation, nothing indicating its purpose in the world other than to be noisy as hell. $CW tried plugging in keyboard and monitor but was unable to get anything he connected to respond, and no rogue IP on the network that could help him ID the purpose. No-one had any ideas what it did, so he performed a Scream Test.
Or at least he tried to - because he could not gracefully shut down (no monitokeyboard would work) he simply tried the old "press the power button for 10 seconds" (the IT equivalent of trying to smother it with a pillow).
When that didn’t work he said a small prayer, yanked the power cord from the back, and hoped that whatever happened to the machine it was not permanent. He then found that the networking for the unit did not run to the switches or business grade router for the office, but was plugged into a cunningly hidden (but consumer grade) second router, with the excellent cable management that matched the rest of the office.
The requisite 1 week period passed, and no screams. $CW found himself with little to do, so he took another look at this mystery machine. He tried plugging the power back in and powering it up, but there was only silence.
$CW, thinking he had killed this little server forever, obtained permission from $Bossman to open up the box and perform last rites. At the least he could pull the drive and work out what the system actually did, at worst he could cannabalise what he could and possibly build a new box for the business.
For those of you boys and girls paying attention, you’ve already guessed when $CW found, but I'm obviously thick and would never have guessed in a million years.
$CW found inside a box that was bereft of the normal computer or server gear you’d find in any kind of server - no Motherboard, no RAM, no drives, nothing but a power supply and some fans. Instead he found an older generation ASIC miner (I’ll leave you guys to google this yourselves for the full details, but short version is “Awesome Bitcoin Miner”) with the miner and the fans on the box the only things connected to the power supply.
The network cable ran into the box, and connected to the miner directly. All external buttons or connections on the tower proper were not actually connected to the internal workings. Power came from the wall to the power supply and straight to the miner. The only way to turn it on or off was inside the box itself.
$CW, being an honest person (much much more honest than I ever could be!), showed what he found $Bossman, explained what it was for, and advised to get the company lawyer involved, possibly the police just to be safe. $Bossman still didn't fully comprehend what was happening other than “$Old_IT was stealing electricity from $SmallCo”, but promised that at the end of that process, if $CW wanted the unit, he could have it.
$Bossman reckons the noisy server had been there for over a year.
$SmallCo found a new permanent IT guy soon after, because while $CW was good he was expensive (contractor rates) and other than the miner discovery $CW was bored. He still hasn’t heard back if he can get his hands on the miner yet, but last he heard $SmallCo was taking $Old_IT to court for the harassment and other items.
Considering how thorough $Old_IT was with everything else in the office, we're contending that he’d have backups of the crypto wallets in safe places, but it's still gotta hurt when you lose your job and your side income simultaneously.
TL;DR – Coworker found a strange box, filled with magical internet money!
submitted by wogfella to talesfromtechsupport [link] [comments]

DAGO, LIBERATING THE CRYPTO-CURRENCY MINING INDUSTRY

The creation of virtual currencies, has really shown the level at which the world has advanced. Since Bitcoin opened the door for other crypto-currencies, a lot of them has flooded the market. This shows the use and the level of adoption that these virtual currencies are gaining globally. These crypto-currencies, (take Bitcoin for an example) are rapidly increasing in value, new coins are emerging into the crypto-currency market, in order to give the users, the best. All these are dependent on the mining industry.
THE MINING INDUSTRY
The crypto-currency mining industry is an industry which is tasked with sourcing for these crypto-currencies. So you see?, this industry plays a vital role in the crypto-currency world, as the crypto-currency values as well as the creation of new crypto-currencies, are based on the mining power of the crypto-currency miners. In fact, the role which the mining industry plays in the crypto-currency world cannot be overemphasized, so should be given the needed attention and support. Energy is one of the most important tools used in the mining industry, it is like the driving force of this industry, as mining requires a great amount of energy, to take place. So the worth of the crypto-currencies mined, is proportional to the energy level utilized. For coins like Bitcoin, with high worth, a whole lot of energy is used during mining. Another set of important tools, used in the mining industry, are the mining equipment. Crypto-currency, being a beneficial and recent trend, cannot be mined with outdated or crude equipment. In order to ensure efficiency and maximum output, highly sophisticated technologies and equipment are used in the mining industry. But the nagging challenge is the blockade which has surfaced in the mining industry.
THE BARRIERS IN THE MINING INDUSTRY
LACK OF CLEAN ENERGY SOURCE This has become a very big challenge in this industry, as the energy required for mining, is inefficient. The available energy which is gotten from fuel burning and fossils, actually result in disasters such as pollution and global warming, if it is continually used in mining. Sadly, the crypto-currency industry, which was supposed to revolutionize the world, is rapidly damaging it, due to it's great need for energy.
EXPENSIVE AND INADEQUATE MINING EQUIPMENT This has been another setback in the mining industry, as there are inefficient technologies for mining, and the available ones are very expensive for crypto-currency miners. So generally, the crypto-currency mining industry has been rendered unproductive, thereby affecting the crypto-currency world, and the global financial system at large. But all these are now a thing of the past, because there is a lasting solution.
INTRODUCING DAGO, CRYPTO-CURRENCY MINING MADE EFFICIENT
Dago is indeed, the answer to the prayers of the mining industry. It is aimed at liberating crypto-currency mining, making it more profitable. Dago will solve the energy problem by adopting the photovoltaics and CSP-fresnel. This enables Dago to provide a green and pure energy, for the miners and other blockchain operations.
Utilizing this sophisticated technology, renewable and adequate energy will be produced, at a very low cost, giving no room for the disasters caused by burning fuel.
That's not all.
Dago does understand the need for pure and green energy, so it does not intend to waste the electricity it will produce. Rather, it will use it's advanced electricity storage technology, to store the electricity produced in excess, which can then be used at night, or when the system is not producing electricity.
Wow!! this is really a great news for the crypto-currency mining industry. And Dago still has a lot more to offer
Dago will provide mining equipment, which will make crypto-currency mining, seamless and effective. With the right tools, a great output is guaranteed. So with Dago mining, the needs of the miners will be met, and mining which is characterized by safety and efficiency, will begin to take place at a very low cost,thereby ensuring profitability.
Also, to ensure the safety of mined crypto-currencies, Dago will also develop a separate internal network, to store the crypto-currencies and fortify it against attacks by cyberpunk.
DAGO TOKEN
DAGO is an ERC-20 based utility token.
It is the native currency of the Dago platform, and will be of great benefit to the investors, as they can hold the token, and get paid dividends at the end of every financial year.
In CONCLUSION
Dago mining has the interest of the crypto-currency industry at heart, so will ensure that everything needed to make the industry a beneficial one, is provided.
https://www.dago-mining.com/ico/
https://reddit.com/link/bhqscy/video/9eyevk690ou21/player
submitted by DAGOMining to u/DAGOMining [link] [comments]

The /r/btc China Dispatch: Episode 4 - Block Size, Chinese Miners and The Great Firewall: Part Two

Hello, Dear Reader, and welcome back to another exciting edition of the /btc China Dispatch. In this series of posts, your humble correspondent translates up-to-the-minute bitcoin banter and news from across the Chinese internet into English for your edification and entertainment!
For those of you who have missed the last three episodes of the /btc China Dispatch, you can catch up via the following links (in order of oldest to newest):
https://www.reddit.com/btc/comments/412afd/the_rbtc_china_dispatch_episode_1_china_reacts_to/ https://www.reddit.com/btc/comments/4184k3/the_rbtc_china_dispatch_episode_2_why_doesnt/ https://www.reddit.com/btc/comments/41dizq/the_rbtc_china_dispatch_episode_3_block_size/
In the last episode, by popular demand I posed the following question to the Chinese bitcoin community: “if Chinese miners are concerned that the Great Firewall of China will affect their ability to process large blocks, why don’t they set up nodes outside of China?”
The 8btc.com community responded with far more enthusiasm for this question than I anticipated, and expressed their desire to open an ongoing channel of communication with the English-speaking community of /btc. As such, this episode will pick up where the last one left off, taking a look at some of the posts that were made in the thread started yesterday after Episode 3’s translation was already complete. As this episode is a “sequel” to Episode 3, I highly recommend you check out Episode 3 before reading further if you have the time.
As the Chinese thread has gained a lot of attention, tomorrow I will select a few of the most upvoted posts in this thread for translation into Chinese so that hopefully we can establish an ongoing dialogue.
Edit: Some people have asked me to post a personal bitcoin address. Here you go: 1Jph5qBjcBPmp1ebMhALomLE4PzaMP18Yp
[Response 1 - Edited]
Posted by LaibitePool (LTC1BTC.com)
I would like you to translate the following message for me, if you could:
It may be that China is painted as a country which is governed by an evil dictatorship in propaganda that is seen by many people.
However, this isn’t the real China. The Chinese government does indeed have many problems, but they are constantly improving.
For example, they are making progress in terms of bitcoin. The Chinese government believes that bitcoin is a legal commodity and can be traded between individuals; they have only forbidden financial institutions from getting involved in bitcoin.
This attitude is much more enlightened and self-assured than that of Russia: Russia came right out and announced that bitcoin is illegal.
I think that the most appropriate way of describing the rule of the Chinese government is: “paternal rule.”
It is true that under the rule of a large government, we are not that free, but this is not without its advantages. For example, it is safer in China for the average man on the street than it is in Europe or the US. A girl can go out alone at 3 AM in the morning for some street barbecue, something that is pretty much unimaginable in many Western countries.
We enjoy highly effective and cheap public transportation and health care. Whereas you need to reserve an appointment for emergency medical treatment a week in advance in the US or Europe, such a situation is unimaginable in China.
China has a population of 1.3 billion people including 670 million internet users. The number of internet users in China alone is already double the entire population of the US. With such a massive and unified market, the level of development of internet service is already better than Europe and catching up with the US. Furthermore, with its massive advantage in terms of manufacturing it was inevitable that China would have an advantage in terms of hashing power. I hope that everyone can understand China’s hashing power and understand China.
Please send us a link when you’ve reposted this so everyone can discuss it. =)
[Response 20]
Posted by feifei0375
I support foreigners engaging in mining and buying Chinese-made mining equipment to compete with [China’s] miners. It is thanks to Chinese people having spent a lot of money buying mining equipment that bitcoin is secured by tremendous hashing power. There wouldn’t be the bitcoin of today without Chinese people.
[Response 21]
Posted by Seven_Steps_to_Heaven
@ feifei0375
The main underlying reason that foreigners don’t mine is because the cost of mining is too high and profits are too low. When you factor in labor costs, administrative costs, power costs and data center construction costs, foreigners don’t have a prayer of competing with China. When you lose money just by powering up your miner, who is going to do it?
There’s a reason that people say that China is a manufacturing powerhouse and the world’s factory.
[Response 22]
Posted by vatten
What I don’t understand and would like for someone from a pool to explain to me is: why is it that with the hashing power in China, pool nodes also have to be in China? As far as I understand it, the amount of data that is transmitted between the miners who mine with a given pool and the pool servers is very small and only allocation of work is need so there’s no transmission of transaction data involved and as a result there’s very little bandwidth used.
The mining pools could establish themselves in a neutral location such as Hong Kong or Singapore, areas where data speeds are basically the same relative to all other locations. As far as miners are concerned, of course they are going to deploy in regions that have cheap power and labor, but the two are basically completely decoupled.
[Response 24]
Posted by sabreiib
@vatten
When at some point in the future the government comes to seize miners’ equipment, it’s the equipment that will be a vital weak spot.
Of course the government is content right now to watch the current spectacle. If bitcoin fails it doesn’t matter at all to them and even if it succeeds with most of the hashing power in China the government can pull the cord any time they want, so they’re not in any hurry. When the government decides to make a move, they will do so in secret initially and the Western community will be “like a fish between a cutting board and a sharp knife.”
[Response 25]
Posted by vatten
@sabreiib
If they seize the miners all that will happen is the hashing rate will go down, and the other miners will get to mine more blocks. There’s nothing to worry about as long as there are pools outside of China.
[Response 26]
Posted by Joomla_Zhou_Zhaohui
China isn’t an evil country, despite the fact that it is chaotic. However, there is no doubt that a certain p4rty and a certain g0vernment are evil.
[Response 28]
Posted by fuck7b
The Great Fire Wall is nothing but an excuse. It’s obvious that Chinese miners are worried that a lifting of the cap as proposed in XT and the like will increase their bandwidth and storage costs. They are only concerned with short term profit and are hindering bitcoin’s long term development. Miners currently widely support the proposal to lift the limit to 2MB, but even if the cap is lifted to 2MB following a hard fork it won’t be long before the transaction bottleneck becomes the same issue it has become at 1 MB and the network is unable to satisfy international transaction needs. A graded expansion of the limit is the best thing for bitcoin’s development.
submitted by KoKansei to btc [link] [comments]

The wilkelvoss are trying to make bitcoin legit according to esquire magazine

Every idea needs a face, even if the faces are illusory simplifications. The country you get is the president you get. The Yankees you get is the shortstop you get. Apple needed Jobs. ISIS needs al-Baghdadi. The moon shot belongs to Bezos. There's nothing under the Facebook sun that doesn't come back to Zuckerberg.
But there is, as yet, no face behind the bitcoin curtain. It's the currency you've heard about but haven't been able to understand. Still to this day nobody knows who created it. For most people, it has something to do with programmable cash and algorithms and the deep space of mathematics, but it also has something to do with heroin and barbiturates and the sex trade and bankruptcies, too. It has no face because it doesn't seem tangible or real. We might align it with an anarchist's riot mask or a highly conceptualized question mark, but those images truncate its reality. Certain economists say it's as important as the birth of the Internet, that it's like discovering ice. Others are sure that it's doomed to melt. In the political sphere, it is the darling of the cypherpunks and libertarians. When they're not busy ignoring it, it scares the living shit out of the big banks and credit-card companies.
ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW
It sparked to life in 2008—when all the financial world prepared for itself the articulate noose—and it knocked on the door like some inconvenient relative arriving at the dinner party in muddy shoes and a knit hat. Fierce ideological battles are currently being waged among the people who own and shepherd the currency. Some shout, Ponzi scheme. Some shout, Gold dust. Bitcoin alone is worth billions of dollars, but the computational structure behind it—its blockchain and its sidechains—could become the absolute underpinning of the world's financial structure for decades to come.
What bitcoin has needed for years is a face to legitimize it, sanitize it, make it palpable to all the naysayers. But it has no Larry Ellison, no Elon Musk, no noticeable visionaries either with or without the truth. There's a lot of ideology at stake. A lot of principle and dogma and creed. And an awful lot of cash, too.
At 6:00 on a Wednesday winter morning, three months after launching Gemini, their bitcoin exchange, Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss step out onto Broadway in New York, wearing the same make of sneakers, the same type of shorts, their baseball caps turned backward. They don't quite fall into the absolute caricature of twindom: They wear different-colored tops. Still, it's difficult to tell them apart, where Tyler ends and Cameron begins. Their faces are sculpted from another era, as if they had stepped from the ruin of one of Gatsby's parties. Their eyes are quick and seldom land on anything for long. Now thirty-four, there is something boyishly earnest about them as they jog down Prince Street, braiding in and out of each other, taking turns talking, as if they were working in shifts, drafting off each other.
Forget, for a moment, the four things the Winklevosses are most known for: suing Mark Zuckerberg, their portrayal in The Social Network, rowing in the Beijing Olympics, and their overwhelming public twinness. Because the Winklevoss brothers are betting just about everything—including their past—on a fifth thing: They want to shake the soul of money out.
At the deep end of their lives, they are athletes. Rowers. Full stop. And the thing about rowing—which might also be the thing about bitcoin—is that it's just about impossible to get your brain around its complexity. Everyone thinks you're going to a picnic. They have this notion you're out catching butterflies. They might ask you if you've got your little boater's hat ready. But it's not like that at all. You're fifteen years old. You rise in the dark. You drag your carcass along the railroad tracks before dawn. The boathouse keys are cold to the touch. You undo the ropes. You carry a shell down to the river. The carbon fiber rips at your hands. You place the boat in the water. You slip the oars in the locks. You wait for your coach. Nothing more than a thumb of light in the sky. It's still cold and the river stinks. That heron hasn't moved since yesterday. You hear Coach's voice before you see him. On you go, lads. You start at a dead sprint. The left rib's a little sore, but you don't say a thing. You are all power and no weight. The first push-to-pull in the water is a ripping surprise. From the legs first. Through the whole body. The arc. Atomic balance. A calm waiting for the burst. Your chest burns, your thighs scald, your brain blanks. It feels as if your rib cage might shatter. You are stillness exploding. You catch the water almost without breaking the surface. Coach says something about the pole vault. You like him. You really do. That brogue of his. Lads this, lads that. Fire. Stamina. Pain. After two dozen strokes, it already feels like you're hitting the wall. All that glycogen gone. Nobody knows. Nobody. They can't even pronounce it. Rowing. Ro-wing. Roh-ing. You push again, then pull. You feel as if you are breaking branch after branch off the bottom of your feet. You don't rock. You don't jolt. Keep it steady. Left, right, left, right. The heron stays still. This river. You see it every day. Nothing behind you. Everything in front. You cross the line. You know the exact tree. Your chest explodes. Your knees are trembling. This is the way the world will end, not with a whimper but a bang. You lean over the side of the boat. Up it comes, the breakfast you almost didn't have. A sign of respect to the river. You lay back. Ah, blue sky. Some cloud. Some gray. Do it again, lads. Yes, sir. You row so hard you puke it up once more. And here comes the heron, it's moving now, over the water, here it comes, look at that thing glide.
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The Winklevoss twins in the men's pair final during the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games. GETTY There's plenty of gin and beer and whiskey in the Harrison Room in downtown Manhattan, but the Winklevoss brothers sip Coca-Cola. The room, one of many in the newly renovated Pier A restaurant, is all mahogany and lamplight. It is, in essence, a floating bar, jutting four hundred feet out into the Hudson River. From the window you can see the Statue of Liberty. It feels entirely like their sort of room, a Jazz Age expectation hovering around their initial appearance—tall, imposing, the hair mannered, the collars of their shirts slightly tilted—but then they just slide into their seats, tentative, polite, even introverted.
They came here by subway early on a Friday evening, and they lean back in their seats, a little wary, their eyes busy—as if they want to look beyond the rehearsal of their words.
They had the curse of privilege, but, as they're keen to note, a curse that was earned. Their father worked to pay his way at a tiny college in backwoods Pennsylvania coal country. He escaped the small mining town and made it all the way to a professorship at Wharton. He founded his own company and eventually created the comfortable upper-middle-class family that came with it. They were raised in Greenwich, Connecticut, the most housebroken town on the planet. They might have looked like the others in their ZIP code, and dressed like them, spoke like them, but they didn't quite feel like them. Some nagging feeling—close to anger, close to fear—lodged itself beneath their shoulders, not quite a chip but an ache. They wanted Harvard but weren't quite sure what could get them there. "You have to be basically the best in the world at something if you're coming from Greenwich," says Tyler. "Otherwise it's like, great, you have a 1600 SAT, you and ten thousand others, so what?"
The rowing was a means to an end, but there was also something about the boat that they felt allowed another balance between them. They pulled their way through high school, Cameron on the port-side oar, Tyler on the starboard. They got to Harvard. The Square was theirs. They rowed their way to the national championships—twice. They went to Oxford. They competed in the Beijing Olympics. They sucked up the smog. They came in sixth place. The cameras loved them. Girls, too. They were so American, sandy-haired, blue-eyed, they could have been cast in a John Cougar Mellencamp song.
It might all have been so clean-cut and whitebread except for the fact that—at one of the turns in the river—they got involved in the most public brawl in the whole of the Internet's nascent history.
They don't talk about it much anymore, but they know that it still defines them, not so much in their own minds but in the minds of others. The story seems simple on one level, but nothing is ever simple, not even simplification. Theirs was the original idea for the first social network, Harvard Connection. They hired Mark Zuckerberg to build it. Instead he went off and created Facebook. They sued him. They settled for $65 million. It was a world of public spats and private anguish. Rumors and recriminations. A few years later, dusty old pre-Facebook text messages were leaked online by Silicon Alley Insider: "Yeah, I'm going to fuck them," wrote Zuckerberg to a friend. "Probably in the ear." The twins got their money, but then they believed they were duped again by an unfairly low evaluation of their stock. They began a second round of lawsuits for $180 million. There was even talk about the Supreme Court. It reeked of opportunism. But they wouldn't let it go. In interviews, they came across as insolent and splenetic, tossing their rattles out of the pram. It wasn't about the money, they said at the time, it was about fairness, reality, justice. Most people thought it was about some further agile fuckery, this time in Zuckerberg's ear.
There are many ways to tell the story, but perhaps the most penetrating version is that they weren't screwed so much by Zuckerberg as they were by their eventual portrayal in the film version of their lives. They appeared querulous and sulky, exactly the type of characters that America, peeling off the third-degree burns of the great recession, needed to hate. While the rest of the country worried about mounting debt and vanishing jobs, they were out there drinking champagne from, at the very least, Manolo stilettos. The truth would never get in the way of a good story. In Aaron Sorkin's world, and on just about every Web site, the blueblood trust-fund boys got what was coming to them. And the best thing now was for them to take their Facebook money and turn the corner, quickly, away, down toward whatever river would whisk them away.
Armie Hammer brilliantly portrayed them as the bluest of bloods in The Social Network. When the twins are questioned about those times now, they lean back a little in their seats, as if they've just lost a long race, a little perplexed that they came off as the victims of Hollywood's ability to throw an image, while the whole rip-roaring regatta still goes on behind them. "They put us in a box," says Cameron, "caricatured to a point where we didn't really exist." He glances around the bar, drums his finger against the glass. "That's fair enough. I understand that impulse." They smart a little when they hear Zuckerberg's name. "I don't think Mark liked being called an asshole," says Tyler, with a flick of bluster in his eyes, but then he catches himself. "You know, maybe Mark doesn't care. He's a bit of a statesman now, out there connecting the world. I have nothing against him. He's a smart guy."
These are men who've been taught, or have finally taught themselves, to tell their story rather than be told by it. But underneath the calm—just like underneath the boat—one can sense the churn.
They say the word—ath-letes—as if it were a country where pain is the passport. One of the things the brothers mention over and over again is that you can spontaneously crack a rib while rowing, just from the sheer exertion of the muscles hauling on the rib cage.
Along came bitcoin.
At its most elemental, bitcoin is a virtual currency. It's the sort of thing a five-year-old can understand—It's just e-cash, Mom—until he reaches eighteen and he begins to question the deep future of what money really means. It is a currency without government. It doesn't need a banker. It doesn't need a bank. It doesn't even need a brick to be built upon. Its supporters say that it bypasses the Man. It is less than a decade old and it has already come through its own Wild West, a story rooted in uncharted digital territory, up from the dust, an evening redness in the arithmetical West.
These are men who've been taught, or have finally taught themselves, to tell their story rather than be told by it. Bitcoin appeared in 2008—westward ho!—a little dot on the horizon of the Internet. It was the brainchild of a computer scientist named Satoshi Nakamoto. The first sting in the tale is that—to this very day—nobody knows who Nakamoto is, where he lives, or how much of his own invention he actually owns. He could be Californian, he could be Australian, he could even be a European conglomerate, but it doesn't really matter, since what he created was a cryptographic system that is borderless and supposedly unbreakable.
In the beginning the currency was ridiculed and scorned. It was money created from ones and zeros. You either bought it or you had to "mine" for it. If you were mining, your computer was your shovel. Any nerd could do it. You keyed your way in. By using your computer to help check and confirm the bitcoin transactions of others, you made coin. Everyone in this together. The computer heated up and mined, down down down, into the mathematical ground, lifting up numbers, making and breaking camp every hour or so until you had your saddlebags full of virtual coin. It all seemed a bit of a lark at first. No sheriff, no deputy, no central bank. The only saloon was a geeky chat room where a few dozen bitcoiners gathered to chew data.
Lest we forget, money was filthy in 2008.
The collapse was coming. The banks were shorting out. The real estate market was a confederacy of dunces. Bernie Madoff's shadow loomed. Occupy was on the horizon. And all those Wall Street yahoos were beginning to squirm.
Along came bitcoin like some Jesse James of the financial imagination. It was the biggest disruption of money since coins. Here was an idea that could revolutionize the financial world. A communal articulation of a new era. Fuck American Express. Fuck Western Union. Fuck Visa. Fuck the Fed. Fuck the Treasury. Fuck the deregulated thievery of the twenty-first century.
To the earliest settlers, bitcoin suggested a moral way out. It was a money created from the ground up, a currency of the people, by the people, for the people, with all government control extinguished. It was built on a solid base of blockchain technology where everyone participated in the protection of the code. It attracted anarchists, libertarians, whistle-blowers, cypherpunks, economists, extropians, geeks, upstairs, downstairs, left-wing, right-wing. Sure, it could be used by businesses and corporations, but it could also be used by poor people and immigrants to send money home, instantly, honestly, anonymously, without charge, with a click of the keyboard. Everyone in the world had access to your transaction, but nobody had to know your name. It bypassed the suits. All you needed to move money was a phone or a computer. It was freedom of economic action, a sort of anarchy at its democratic best, no rulers, just rules.
Bitcoin, to the original explorers, was a safe pass through the government-occupied valleys: Those assholes were up there in the hills, but they didn't have any scopes on their rifles, and besides, bitcoin went through in communal wagons at night.
Ordinary punters took a shot. Businesses, too. You could buy silk ties in Paris without any extra bank charges. You could protect your money in Buenos Aires without fear of a government grab.
The Winklevoss twins leave the U.S. Court of Appeals in 2011, after appearing in court to ask that the previous settlement case against Facebook be voided. GETTY But freedom can corrupt as surely as power. It was soon the currency that paid for everything illegal under the sun, the go-to money of the darknet. The westward ho! became the outlaw territory of Silk Road and beyond. Heroin through the mail. Cocaine at your doorstep. Child porn at a click. What better way for terrorists to ship money across the world than through a network of anonymous computers? Hezbollah, the Taliban, the Mexican cartels. In Central America, kidnappers began demanding ransom in bitcoin—there was no need for the cash to be stashed under a park bench anymore. Now everything could travel down the wire. Grab, gag, and collect. Uranium could be paid for in bitcoin. People, too. The sex trade was turned on: It was a perfect currency for Madame X. For the online gambling sites, bitcoin was pure jackpot.
For a while, things got very shady indeed. Over a couple years, the rate pinballed between $10 and $1,200 per bitcoin, causing massive waves and troughs of online panic and greed. (In recent times, it has begun to stabilize between $350 and $450.) In 2014, it was revealed that hackers had gotten into the hot wallet of Mt. Gox, a bitcoin exchange based in Tokyo. A total of 850,000 coins were "lost," at an estimated value of almost half a billion dollars. The founder of Silk Road, Ross William Ulbricht (known as "Dread Pirate Roberts"), got himself a four-by-six room in a federal penitentiary for life, not to mention pending charges for murder-for-hire in Maryland.
Everyone thought that bitcoin was the problem. The fact of the matter was, as it so often is, human nature was the problem. Money means desire. Desire means temptation. Temptation means that people get hurt.
During the first Gold Rush in the late 1840s, the belief was that all you needed was a pan and a decent pair of boots and a good dose of nerve and you could go out and make yourself a riverbed millionaire. Even Jack London later fell for the lure of it alongside thousands of others: the western test of manhood and the promise of wealth. What they soon found out was that a single egg could cost twenty-five of today's dollars, a pound of coffee went for a hundred, and a night in a whorehouse could set you back $6,000.
A few miners hit pay dirt, but what most ended up with for their troubles was a busted body and a nasty dose of syphilis.
The gold was discovered on the property of John Sutter in Sacramento, but the one who made the real cash was a neighboring merchant, Samuel Brannan. When Brannan heard the news of the gold nuggets, he bought up all the pickaxes and shovels he could find, filled a quinine bottle with gold dust, and went to San Francisco. Word went around like a prayer in a flash flood: gold gold gold. Brannan didn't wildcat for gold himself, but at the peak of the rush he was flogging $5,000 worth of shovels a day—that's $155,000 today—and went on to become the wealthiest man in California, alongside the Wells Fargo crew, Levi Strauss, and the Studebaker family, who sold wheelbarrows.
If you comb back through the Winklevoss family, you will find a great-grandfather and a great-great-grandfather who knew a thing or two about digging: They worked side by side in the coal mines of Pennsylvania. They didn't go west and they didn't get rich, but maybe the lesson became part of their DNA: Sometimes it's the man who sells the shovels who ends up hitting gold.
Like it or not—and many people don't like it—the Winklevoss brothers are shaping up to be the Samuel Brannans of the bitcoin world.
Nine months after being portrayed in The Social Network, the Winklevoss twins were back out on the water at the World Rowing Cup. CHRISTOPHER LEE/GETTY They heard about it first poolside in Ibiza, Spain. Later it would play into the idea of ease and privilege: umbrella drinks and girls in bikinis. But if the creation myth was going to be flippant, the talk was serious. "I'd say we were cautious, but we were definitely intrigued," says Cameron. They went back home to New York and began to read. There was something about it that got under their skin. "We knew that money had been so broken and inefficient for years," says Tyler, "so bitcoin appealed to us right away."
They speak in braided sentences, catching each other, reassuring themselves, tightening each other's ideas. They don't quite want to say that bitcoin looked like something that might be redemptive—after all, they, like everyone else, were looking to make money, lots of it, Olympic-sized amounts—but they say that it did strike an idealistic chord inside them. They certainly wouldn't be cozying up to the anarchists anytime soon, but this was a global currency that, despite its uncertainties, seemed to present a solution to some of the world's more pressing problems. "It was borderless, instantaneous, irreversible, decentralized, with virtually no transaction costs," says Tyler. It could possibly cut the banks out, and it might even take the knees out from under the credit-card companies. Not only that, but the price, at just under ten dollars per coin, was in their estimation low, very low. They began to snap it up.
They were aware, even at the beginning, that they might, once again, be called Johnny-come-latelys, just hopping blithely on the bandwagon—it was 2012, already four years into the birth of the currency—but they went ahead anyway, power ten. Within a short time they'd spent $11 million buying up a whopping 1 percent of the world's bitcoin, a position they kept up as more bitcoins were mined, making their 1 percent holding today worth about $66 million.
But bitcoin was flammable. The brothers felt the burn quickly. Their next significant investment came later that year, when they gave $1.5 million in venture funding to a nascent exchange called BitInstant. Within a year the CEO was arrested for laundering drug money through the exchange.
So what were a pair of smart, clean-cut Olympic rowers doing hanging around the edges of something so apparently shady, and what, if anything, were they going to do about it?
They mightn't have thought of it this way, but there was something of the sheriff striding into town, the one with the swagger and the scar, glancing up at the balconies as he comes down Main Street, all tumbleweeds and broken pianos. This place was a dump in most people's eyes, but the sheriff glimpsed his last best shot at finally getting the respect he thinks he deserves.
The money shot: A good stroke will catch the water almost without breaking its seal. You stir without rippling. Your silence is sinewy. There's muscle in that calm. The violence catches underneath, thrusts the boat along. Stroke after stroke. Just keep going. Today's truth dies tomorrow. What you have to do is elemental enough. You row without looking behind you. You keep the others in front of you. As long as you can see what they're doing, it's all in your hands. You are there to out-pain them. Doesn't matter who they are, where they come from, how they got here. Know your enemy through yourself. Push through toward pull. Find the still point of this pain. Cut a melody in the disk of your flesh. The only terror comes when they pass you—if they ever pass you.
There are no suits or ties, but there is a white hum in the offices of Gemini in the Flatiron District. The air feels as if it has been brushed clean. There is something so everywhereabout the place. Ergonomic chairs. iPhone portals. Rows of flickering computers. Not so much a hush around the room as a quiet expectation. Eight, nine people. Programmers, analysts, assistants. Other employees—teammates, they call them—dialing in from Portland, Oregon, and beyond.
The brothers fire up the room when they walk inside. A fist-pump here, a shoulder touch there. At the same time, there is something almost shy about them. Apart, they seem like casual visitors to the space they inhabit. It is when they're together that they feel fully shaped. One can't imagine them being apart from each other for very long.
The Winklevoss twins speak onstage at Bitcoin! Let's Cut Through the Noise Already at SXSW in 2016. GETTY They move from desk to desk. The price goes up, the price goes down. The phones ring. The e-mails beep. Customer-service calls. Questions about fees. Inquiries about tax structures.
Gemini was started in late 2015 as a next-generation bitcoin exchange. It is not the first such exchange in the world by any means, but it is one of the most watched. The company is designed with ordinary investors in mind, maybe a hedge fund, maybe a bank: all those people who used to be confused or even terrified by the word bitcoin. It is insured. It is clean. What's so fascinating about this venture is that the brothers are risking themselves by trying to eliminate risk: keeping the boat steady and exploding through it at the same time.
It is when they're together that they feel fully shaped. One can't imagine them being apart from each other for very long. For the past couple years, the Winklevosses have worked closely with just about every compliance agency imaginable. They ticked off all the regulatory boxes. Essentially they wanted to ease all the Debting Thomases. They put regulatory frameworks in place. Security and bankability and insurance were their highest objectives. Nobody was going to be able to blow open the safe. They wanted to soothe all the appetites for risk. They told Bitcoin Magazine they were asking for "permission, not forgiveness."
This is where bitcoin can become normal—that is, if you want bitcoin to be normal.
Just a mile or two down the road, in Soho, a half dozen bitcoiners gather at a meetup. The room is scruffy, small, boxy. A half mannequin is propped on a table, a scarf draped around it. It's the sort of place that twenty years ago would have been full of cigarette smoke. There's a bit of Allen Ginsberg here, a touch of Emma Goldman, a lot of Zuccotti Park. The wine is free and the talk is loose. These are the true believers. They see bitcoin in its clearest possible philosophical terms—the frictionless currency of the people, changing the way people move money around the world, bypassing the banks, disrupting the status quo.
A comedy show is being run out in the backyard. A scruffy young man wanders in and out, announcing over and over again that he is half-baked. A well-dressed Asian girl sidles up to the bar. She looks like she's just stepped out of an NYU business class. She's interested in discovering what bitcoin is. She is regaled by a series of convivial answers. The bartender tells her that bitcoin is a remaking of the prevailing power structures. The girl asks for another glass of wine. The bartender adds that bitcoin is democracy, pure and straight. She nods and tells him that the wine tastes like cooking oil. He laughs and says it wasn't bought with bitcoin. "I don't get it," she says. And so the evening goes, presided over by Margaux Avedisian, who describes herself as the queen of bitcoin. Avedisian, a digital-currency consultant of Armenian descent, is involved in several high-level bitcoin projects. She has appeared in documentaries and on numerous panels. She is smart, sassy, articulate.
When the talk turns to the Winklevoss brothers, the bar turns dark. Someone, somewhere, reaches up to take all the oxygen out of the air. Avedisian leans forward on the counter, her eyes shining, delightful, raged.
"The Winklevii are not the face of bitcoin," she says. "They're jokes. They don't know what they're saying. Nobody in our community respects them. They're so one-note. If you look at their exchange, they have no real volume, they never will. They keep throwing money at different things. Nobody cares. They're not part of us. They're just hangers-on."
"Ah, they're just assholes," the bartender chimes in.
"What they want to do," says Avedisian, "is lobotomize bitcoin, make it into something entirely vapid. They have no clue."
The Asian girl leaves without drinking her third glass of free wine. She's got a totter in her step. She doesn't quite get the future of money, but then again maybe very few in the world do.
Giving testimony on bitcoin licensing before the New York State Department of Financial Services in 2014. LUCAS JACKSON/REUTERS The future of money might look like this: You're standing on Oxford Street in London in winter. You think about how you want to get to Charing Cross Road. The thought triggers itself through electrical signals into the chip embedded in your wrist. Within a moment, a driverless car pulls up on the sensor-equipped road. The door opens. You hop in. The car says hello. You tell it to shut up. It does. It already knows where you want to go. It turns onto Regent Street. You think,A little more air-conditioning, please. The vents blow. You think, Go a little faster, please. The pace picks up. You think, This traffic is too heavy, use Quick(TM). The car swings down Glasshouse Street. You think, Pay the car in front to get out of my way. It does. You think, Unlock access to a shortcut. The car turns down Sherwood Street to Shaftsbury Avenue. You pull in to Charing Cross. You hop out. The car says goodbye. You tell it to shut up again. You run for the train and the computer chip in your wrist pays for the quiet-car ticket for the way home.
All of these transactions—the air-conditioning, the pace, the shortcut, the bribe to get out of the way, the quick lanes, the ride itself, the train, maybe even the "shut up"—will cost money. As far as crypto-currency enthusiasts think, it will be paid for without coins, without phones, without glass screens, just the money coming in and going out of your preprogrammed wallet embedded beneath your skin.
The Winklevosses are betting that the money will be bitcoin. And that those coins will flow through high-end, corporate-run exchanges like Gemini rather than smoky SoHo dives.
Cameron leans across a table in a New York diner, the sort of place where you might want to polish your fork just in case, and says: "The future is here, it's just not evenly distributed yet." He can't remember whom the quote belongs to, but he freely acknowledges that it's not his own. Theirs is a truculent but generous intelligence, capable of surprise and turn at the oddest of moments. They talk meditation, they talk economics, they talk Van Halen, they talk, yes, William Gibson, but everything comes around again to bitcoin.
"The key to all this is that people aren't even going to know that they're using bitcoin," says Tyler. "It's going to be there, but it's not going to be exposed to the end user. Bitcoin is going to be the rails that underpin our payment systems. It's just like an IP address. We don't log on to a series of numbers, 115.425.5 or whatever. No, we log on to Google.com. In the same way, bitcoin is going to be disguised. There will be a body kit that makes it user-friendly. That's what makes bitcoin a kick-ass currency."
Any fool can send a billion dollars across the world—as long as they have it, of course—but it's virtually impossible to send a quarter unless you stick it in an envelope and pay forty-nine cents for a stamp. It's one of the great ironies of our antiquated money system. And yet the quark of the financial world is essentially the small denomination. What bitcoin promises is that it will enable people and businesses to send money in just about any denomination to one another, anywhere in the world, for next to nothing. A public address, a private key, a click of the mouse, and the money is gone.
A Bitcoin conference in New York City in 2014. GETTY This matters. This matters a lot. Credit-card companies can't do this. Neither can the big banks under their current systems. But Marie-Louise on the corner of Libertador Avenue can. And so can Pat Murphy in his Limerick housing estate. So can Mark Andreessen and Bill Gates and Laurene Powell Jobs. Anyone can do it, anywhere in the world, at virtually no charge.
You can do it, in fact, from your phone in a diner in New York. But the whole time they are there—over identical California omelettes that they order with an ironic shrug—they never once open their phones. They come across more like the talkative guys who might buy you a drink at the sports bar than the petulants ordering bottle service in the VIP corner. The older they get, the more comfortable they seem in their contradictions: the competition, the ease; the fame, the quiet; the gamble, the sure thing.
Bitcoin is what might eventually make them among the richest men in America. And yet. There is always a yet. What seems indisputable about the future of money, to the Winklevosses and other bitcoin adherents, is that the technology that underpins bitcoin—the blockchain—will become one of the fundamental tenets of how we deal with the world of finance. Blockchain is the core computer code. It's open source and peer to peer—in other words, it's free and open to you and me. Every single bitcoin transaction ever made goes to an open public ledger. It would take an unprecedented 51 percent attack—where one entity would come to control more than half of the computing power used to mine bitcoin—for hackers to undo it. The blockchain is maintained by computers all around the world, and its future sidechains will create systems that deal with contracts and stock and other payments. These sidechains could very well be the foundation of the new global economy for the big banks, the credit-card companies, and even government itself.
"It's boundless," says Cameron.
This is what the brothers are counting on—and what might eventually make them among the richest men in America.
And yet. There is always a yet.
When you delve into the world of bitcoin, it gets deeper, darker, more mysterious all the time. Why has its creator remained anonymous? Why did he drop off the face of the earth? How much of it does he own himself? Will banks and corporations try to bring the currency down? Why are there really only five developers with full "commit access" to the code (not the Winklevosses, by the way)? Who is really in charge of the currency's governance?
Perhaps the most pressing issue at hand is that of scaling, which has caused what amounts to a civil war among followers. A maximum block size of one megabyte has been imposed on the chain, sort of like a built-in artificial dampener to keep bitcoin punk rock. That's not nearly enough capacity for the number of transactions that would take place in future visions. In years to come, there could be massive backlogs and outages that could create instant financial panic. Bitcoin's most influential leaders are haggling over what will happen. Will bitcoin maintain its decentralized status, or will it go legit and open up to infinite transactions? And if it goes legit, where's the punk?
The issues are ongoing—and they might very well take bitcoin down, but the Winklevosses don't think so. They have seen internal disputes before. They've refrained from taking a public stance mostly because they know that there are a lot of other very smart people in bitcoin who are aware that crisis often builds consensus. "We're in this for the long haul," says Tyler. "We're the first batter in the first inning."
GILLIAN LAUB The waiter comes across and asks them, bizarrely, if they're twins. They nod politely. Who was born first? They've heard it a million times and their answer is always the same: Neither of them—they were born cesarean. Cameron looks older, says the waiter. Tyler grins. Normally it's the other way around, says Cameron, grinning back. Do you ever fight? asks the waiter. Every now and then, they say. But not over this, not over the future.
Heraclitus was wrong. You can, in fact, step in the same river twice. In the beginning you went to the shed. No electricity there, no heat, just a giant tub where you simulated the river. You could only do eleven strokes. But there was something about the repetition, the difference, even the monotony, that hooked you. After a while it wasn't an abandoned shed anymore. College gyms, national training centers. Bigger buildings. High ceilings. AC. Doctors and trainers. Monitors hooked up to your heart, your head, your blood. Six foot five, but even then you were not as tall as the other guys. You liked the notion of underdog. Everyone called you the opposite. The rich kids. The privileged ones. To hell with that. They don't know us, who we are, where we came from. Some of the biggest chips rest on the shoulders of those with the least to lose. Six foot five times two makes just about thirteen feet. You sit in the erg and you stare ahead. Day in, day out. One thousand strokes, two thousand. You work with the very best. You even train with the Navy SEALs. It touches that American part of you. The sentiment, the false optimism. When the oil fields are burning, you even think, I'll go there with them. But you stay in the boat. You want that other flag rising. That's what you aim for. You don't win but you get close. Afterward there are planes, galas, regattas, magazine spreads, but you always come back to that early river. The cold. The fierceness. The heron. Like it or not, you're never going to get off the water—that's just the fact of the matter, it's always going to be there. Hard to admit it, but once you were wrong. You got out of the boat and you haggled over who made it. You lost that one, hard. You might lose this one, too, but then again it just might be the original arc that you're stepping toward. So you return, then. You rise before dark. You drag your carcass along Broadway before dawn.
All the rich men in the world want to get shot into outer space. Richard Branson. Jeff Bezos. Elon Musk. The new explorers. To get the hell out of here and see if they—and maybe we—can exist somewhere else for a while. It's the story of the century. We want to know if the pocket of the universe can be turned inside out. We're either going to bring all the detritus of the world upward with us or we're going to find a brand-new way to exist. The cynical say that it's just another form of colonization—they're probably right, but then again maybe it's our only way out.
The Winklevosses have booked their tickets—numbers 700 and 701—on Branson's Virgin Galactic. Although they go virtually everywhere together, the twins want to go on different flights because of the risk involved: Now that they're in their mid-thirties, they can finally see death, or at least its rumor. It's a boy's adventure, but it's also the outer edge of possibility. It cost a quarter of a million dollars per seat, and they paid for it, yes, in bitcoin.
Of course, up until recently, the original space flights all splashed down into the sea. One of the ships that hauled the Gemini space capsule out of the water in 1965 was the Intrepid aircraft carrier.
The Winklevosses no longer pull their boat up the river. Instead they often run five miles along the Hudson to the Intrepid and back. The destroyer has been parked along Manhattan's West Side for almost as long as they have been alive. It's now a museum. The brothers like the boat, its presence, its symbolism: Intrepid, Gemini, the space shot.
They ease into the run.
submitted by thegrandknight to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Transcript of George Webb Video Series Part 265 "Hillary's Leakers, Hackers, and Henchmen" [@Georgwebb / #HRCRatline]

  • Day 112.2 Uranium One Witnesses - The Real Lambert or Fake Campbell Soup? - YouTube
    • It's day 112 and it's part 2 and there's some new breaking news about Campbell here
    • As you know in the past we've done a lot of shows about 75 days ago on Mark Lambert
    • And the difference between Campbell being kind of more of a K Street guy
    • He's being represented by two K Street lawyers that live there that work extremely close like right across the street from him
    • More of a kind of an interface between Washington DC and the FBI let's say and the nuclear industry
    • Whereas Mark Lambert being a Navy Intel guy, knows all the logistics, knows all the nuclear science, knows all the languages, I mean just really deep expert in this whole trade
    • We're talking all the way the whole nuclear cycle--from the ore to the Kroupnick crushers, to the yellowcake, to the spinning of the Uranium in Paducah, to the--making fuel out of it for the different Duke Energy plants, all the way to getting into the plant the nuclear fuel rod plant in Tennessee, to getting it into the Navy ships an electric boat at the at the shipyards in Mobile, and the shipyards in Wilmington, and the shipyards in Groton, Connecticut--
    • So he knows the whole cycle, as well as when the rods come back from those different ships
    • And how to bring them through South Carolina
    • And then bring them up to Sharon Harris for storage
    • And then use of that MOX fuel for hey let's use this MOX fuel that has these plutonium for CANDU reactors around the world
    • Why why do we want to store this?
    • Let's let's use this nuclear fuel cycle
    • So Campbell being really kind of really kind of a bagman--I hate to say it--Lambert being the real expert
    • And this is where an informed public really can say hey look I don't--you didn't give me enough detail with the John Solomon's story here
    • With--there was some yellowcake that went to Europe and some yellowcake that went to Asia
    • That's not specific enough
    • You didn't give me enough information about what what is this STX spin-off?
    • This sport transport logistics
    • What is this why the soccer balls in Sialkot
    • What's what's going on there
    • You're doing Uranium One day and then you're talking about cake and soccer balls
    • The next day you're talking about envy cylinders going back to to Piketon Ohio
    • What's going on there? Don't quite understand that
    • So this Uranium One story is developing second thing to support my theory that--Hilary spent most of her time on these one-two-three agreements here
    • Is just looking at the NNSA and looking at the agreements
    • And looking at the dates of the agreements
    • And seeing most of them were signed when she was either shadow Secretary of State in 1997, with Argentina,
    • Or with Australia, when she was Secretary of State
    • Shadow Secretary of State with Brazil
    • CANDU is Canada becomes the kind of surreptitious partner
    • If there's a problem there's no one-two-three agreement, we'll just start the program with Canada, and we'll take our National Lab information and we'll give it to them
    • China with Kerry being kind of a stand-in secretary of state
    • Moving down here to the European and International atomic energy
    • These are kind of like brokers for anybody
    • They can take technology for Europe or Asia for our yellowcake right
    • Now India was signed by Bush
    • But then as well as Indonesia and Japan
    • But then look at Kazakhstan. Kind of comes in at the end and that's where this megatons to megawatts kind of comes in
    • And they've been used to getting away with
    • They've been used to branding this and having a--person like Share Blue media come in and David Brock and and--paint the pretty pictures
    • And everybody goes hey that sounds like a good idea
    • Take nuclear weapons and then make--nuclear fuel out of it--what a great idea
    • When in actual fact something very different is happening at the ground level
    • And that's why I like the Mark Lambert's of the world, that actually deal with it on the ground level you could even see here that Morocco--scales up its program
    • And then Norway signs a deal the day before Trump--I think Podesta may have been in Norway during that negotiation right there at the end
    • And then of course the Russian Federation while Hillary signs it's one two three well
    • Hillary is there
    • South Africa comes in with Marc Rich this is the influence of Marc Rich
    • Switzerland, Marc Rich, I think there's a lot of reactors in Switzerland that we don't know about buried deep beneath the hills there
    • That's Allen Dulles type thinking
    • As well as Taiwan and Turkey
    • So this really is where the money is--a thousand times more valuable, I think the HEU then the gold
    • Now here's the mixed oxide fuel
    • And the nice part about mixed oxide fuel--this could be coming from weapons programs right
    • So it could utilize surplus weapons-grade Uranium
    • And then you can use it in these CANDU reactors--these fast reactors okay
    • So you could build those CANDUs in China you can build them in Iran you could build them in Pakistan you can build them in India South Africa all over the world, through Canada, and there you go you're in business
    • And then you can sign the nuclear deal later on--the one two three agreement later on
    • And here's your can do reactors and I think this--the partnership with Trudeau's have been it's been a long time
    • Not just the current Trudeau, but the father--they had a very strong relationship with the Clintons--a good business relationship
    • And again, you can use and leverage--if you insert yourself and infiltrate yourself into these national laboratories with Awan-type infiltration program--it really works well
    • And I think these Dukes--these are the kind of the insiders
    • They consider themselves maybe the knowledge Dukes
    • And I think they have some progenitors that they look to and
    • They go--there was almost smart Nazi scientists this is released--celebrated there's a facility I visited in northern France, which is the Peda Munda v2 rocket plant
    • It's incredibly automated for 80 years ago, really quite impressive
    • And then there's this kind of the the bad boy of the bunch--that was not a Nazi u-boat commander the wolf pack
    • This is the--Navy irregular warfare under--three three three 333 half evil--the Wolf Pack idea
    • And I think really the Dukes if the Dukes had any attitude, it would be more like the Nazi u-boat commander kind of thing
    • A stealth infiltration etc
    • And then there's a good heap of of Nazi Intelligence thrown in there as well in this group in the Dukes
    • This is where I think the FBI side of the Dukes is
    • Not the Navy Intel side, but more the FBI side which is really the same thing I guess
    • But man this looks like Rod Rosenstein
    • Having seen Rod Rosenstein up close, I thought it was Reinhardt Gehlen when I saw him
    • I said that's not Rod Rosenstein that's Rhinehart Gehlen
    • And somebody said no no that's he's testifying in front of Congress
    • That's Rod Rosenstein
    • So anyway but what the Nazis did Indian Intel did was their strategy was hey we're not strong--in Africa as the US or Britain especially Britain England
    • So we're gonna develop these groups
    • We're gonna leverage these current groups that are on the ground and to get the mining
    • Get the land get the Uranium, get the gold, get them molybdenum whatever they needed right for war
    • And isn't Isis that exact same thing?
    • Isn't really aren't the Awans really just an expression of the old Nazi modus operandi?
    • Now I'm not saying these current dukes are Nazis
    • But there is kind of this Pax urania, through our Intelligence and through our knowledge into our brainpower, and through our knowledge of military, and through our knowledge of Intelligence, we're going to end up ruling the world through this valuable resources that's worth a thousand times more than gold
  • Day 120.3. Revenge of the Nuclear Nazis - YouTube
    • Day 112 as part 3 it's a beautiful day here in Washington even though it is quite cold still
    • So the latest news was this fake police force
    • Now we had a fake police officer here in our lobby after a Task Force's room was turned over
    • Then a very solid female cop came in, very professional, was filling out a police report
    • She left the room said I'll be right back
    • And then Task Force came down about an hour later, because nobody came back up to the room
    • And there was this fake cop there a guy, with a beard, tattoo, looked like he just had put on his shirt, and fake badge, and fake gun
    • Or a real gun but--didn't--looked very sloppy and disheveled
    • Not an authoritative police officer
    • Well this is exactly what Kamala Harris was her staff was just busted for
    • Having a fake police force fake badges--may have been at the Auto Auction--for police cars
    • But are being used now under the color-of-law as real police cars
    • And that is pretty much what Kamala Harris got busted for
    • So was was were they telling the truth? Was Task Force telling the truth?
    • I think she was because I was there
    • I do also know that at a very high level lieutenant commander in the Navy was here at 5:30 in the morning
    • Because I came down and begging for the for the security cam footage
    • Because this fake cop squared off,
    • When Task Force demanded to have a police report done, and said you're a police officer, that's your job, he squared off
    • Did not unholster the weapon but grabbed the weapon and squared off on her
    • So this is something that is real
    • And if you don't think JTTF runs this--then well you don't have to think that
    • But JTTF is in this position of being a part of a program and a Counterintelligence side
    • That got developed 20 years ago with John Brennan
    • And Andy McCabe was the knight in shining armor inside the FBI, fixing all the little--being the hands and feet of John Brennan
    • And they have infiltrated the FBI through the Counterintelligence division
    • It's just the way it happened
    • Same way that the Nazis they came over here in Fort Hunt
    • And the Counterintelligence division of the Nazis got into the CIA same exact way
    • So and then this whole idea of Nuclear Nazi
    • Oh by the way then it was a Navy guy that asked for the tape--he got the tapes
    • And he reported to the Chief of Naval Operations
    • Again, down at NAVSEA Navy Sea Command in Navy yard
    • So it all roads lead to the Navy Yard
    • Not just Washington DC
    • They lead to the Navy Yard
    • And so there's this kind of group of thousand 100 partners these Frank Giustra partners
    • I'm not saying they're all Navy
    • I'm not saying they're all FBI
    • I'm not saying they're all CIA
    • I'm not saying they're all Wall Street types and mining types
    • But it's it's it's a group it's a consortium of about eleven hundred of them
    • So anyway they are acting like Nuclear Nazis
    • So that's why I call them the Nuclear Nazis
    • And they do bear an awful strong resemblance to Rhinehart Galen Rod Rosenstein
    • And Mueller certainly looks very much like Heinrich Mueller
  • Day 112.4. Kamilla Harris and Becerra’s Weird Navy Freemasons - YouTube
    • It's day 112--this is part four
    • And we've got some Senators looking like they're leaving now
    • Maybe there won't be a vote today the budget bill
    • Looks like Rand Paul may have introduced a late amendment to cap the budget, which I can see his point
    • 160 billion dollar increase on the Republican side 131 billion dollar increase on the domestic side
    • So that's pretty pretty astonishing increase
    • The story that kind of resurfaced from 2016, speaking of Senators--the Senator from California Kamala Harris was they had this weird Freemasons group
    • And this is that Navy Intel our Navy Intel kind of Masonic group that is resurfacing in America over the last eight to nine years, when Hillary became Secretary of State
    • This this group I think we got some action
    • So anyway kind of this weird group kind of almost a Brownshirts kind of in feel
    • Paramilitary
    • And one of the guys was named Henry I believe--his name was David Henry
    • Did you get an ID?
    • There some kind of Grand Master whatever
    • But there is this kind of Navy Intel Freemasons weird paramilitary organization that Hillary has
    • There's these SES folks these senior executive service folks actually owned these things
    • They have names like first American security
    • And always American Eagle in the Sun security
    • And they're kind of like I would call them blue shirts
    • So it's almost like a TSA all the other shirts kind of look like the TSA
    • And it's it's a group of a family usually of about 50 to 60 people
    • And it's perfect for drug running
    • It's the perfect color-of-law--the Nazis are the same way when they got into South America
    • They needed to run and get something going in terms of money they started running drugs through Cuba, with a Helliwell plan
    • And it kind of reminds me of the same thing
    • It had that color-of-law feel that they didn't used to have, with MS-13 in LA area with the Crips and bloods...
    • So this it's almost like the Crips and bloods got older, and got better t-shirts or better security shirts
    • And now they are running the color-of-law operations in these major metropolitan cities especially ports
    • Now I'm also including Kansas City in that is a port
    • St. Louis as a port
    • The sky port in Phoenix...
    • But wherever there are those kind of Federal trade ports and Federal trade protection, it seems to be that's where the concentration of this Navy stuff is
    • And you have to go back to Carter Page
    • And again, no one in Washington seems to drill down
    • Carter Page being a member of the Hillary Clinton campaign team, transition team, Armed Services Committee team, and then he goes on to the Pentagon to work in nuclear non-proliferation
    • So I don't know what the hard part of this is
    • You just drill down to a couple Google searches, and find out he's been a part of the Clinton camp in terms of DoD in the Navy Intel for a long time
    • As long as Bannon as long as Bannon
    • So we'll we'll follow it along
    • We haven't got the memo yet from down at the White House
    • But we're waiting for that as well
    • So we'll see we'll we'll keep it and keep you posted as things as things occur
  • Day 112.6. Drilling Down On the Carter Page Narrative - YouTube
    • Day 112 here we are foot lights of Washington DC up there Barrick Gold and of course Fox News Fox News
    • Gonna be up there too probably tonight
    • It's gonna be beautiful
    • They're gonna cover this shutdown Schumer shutdown showdown Schumer shutdown showdown
    • So who knows it'll be exciting night
    • But I'm on a different story, which is really drilling down on this narrative
    • So many of the Washington narratives don't get drilled down on for instance where does Carter Page live in Washington DC 2111 2111 Wisconsin
    • Where is that close to?
    • Well you you probably remember DC classic motors classic motors DC was 4800 a little bit up the hill on Wisconsin Avenue
    • You remember all the embassies and all the stuff that was on Wisconsin Avenue
    • You probably remember American University
    • You probably remember Tenleytown
    • Friendship Heights
    • CA village up there
    • You probably remember eight Navy Intel and all that stuff and me all the other people that lived up there in our story
    • I think Charisse Pepingion lived up there right about 4800 5400 Wisconsin
    • So we know all that's up there we know about the Navy observatory we've gone there many times in this story
    • We know the Navy observatory is under the vice president
    • The vice president has the global view the eye of G.O.D. all over the world from the Navy observatory
    • Where does carter page live?
    • He lives on Navy observatory circle
    • 2111 I'm not joking here 2111 Navy observatory circle
    • I think he lives in apartment 224
    • Would love to talk to him
    • Who lives close to there who lives close to the British Embassy
    • Who trades thumb drives in the in the British Embassy parking lot?
    • Craig Murray!
    • Who else lives there? (hey scrunch)
    • Who else lives there? who else lives there? 3067 Whitehaven 3067 Whitehaven
    • You're never going to get away from 3067 whitehaven if you're Hillary Clinton, because that is how you get into the British Embassy at night--gotta have parties
    • 3067 Whitehaven about a five-minute walk from Carter Pages' place
    • Why is that important?
    • Well Carter Page is in the transition team of Hillary Clinton, in the campaign of Hillary Clinton, always seems to be hanging around the White House
    • Hanging around the down that way hanging around the West Wing always in talking about nuclear proliferation NNSA
    • Who knows? We got to ask these questions to Carter Page
    • But Carter Page goes to London
    • Does he meet Papadopoulos there?
    • He does three chances at his PhD
    • His prof. in London says he failed three times on his PhD--who knows? we got to find that out
    • He goes to Georgetown for his master's before that in political science
    • Let's ask him the question
    • What did you what what--what were you thinking national security
    • What was it what were you thinking?
    • So Carter Page is going to be the key to this whole narrative
    • Hey let's throw the president out
    • Let's impeach the president
    • Shouldn't we drill down on that story?
    • Shouldn't we drill down and find out who Carter Page is, before everybody gets thrown out of office?
    • Shouldn't we drill down on who George Papadopolis is
    • So that's what I'm gonna do
    • And Fox will be here tonight
    • They'll do their part we'll all get there
    • We're all going to get to the true narrative of what is really happening in Washington
    • Are these school plays or are we dealing with the truth?
  • Day 112.7. No Time For Mele Mouth Prattle - YouTube
    • Day 112 this is probably part six and
    • So this is going to be to the Fourth Estate right
    • And if you don't remember the Fourth Estate speech in British Parliament
    • It was Wilberforce, I believe, I believe
    • I could be wrong, but I believe it was Wilberforce
    • And he was the obviously the willing force against slavery, and the compelling force in the 1840s I think in Britain against slavery
    • And he is the one who gathered public opinion, even though the votes were against him
    • He was the one who gathered public opinion in Parliament, and said, "you gentlemen, you gentlemen, pointing to the gallery"
    • It very sexist then--no women reporters--the only man reporters of the post and the London Times
    • You gentlemen are the members that will ensure the right course of history
    • You gentlemen are the Fourth Estate
    • You gentlemen will guide the hand of history
    • You gentlemen are every bit as important as these three--the king, the Commons, and the Lords in our future
    • {{ 911: it's clergy, royals, people and press }}
    • And that was really the first time that ever in the parliamentary procedure that the press was recognized every bit as powerful as the Commons and the Lords and and the King
    • (Hey scrunch! Hey scruncherific! Scruncherif)
    • So I call on all journalists now to stop being a mealy-mouthed pablum repeating prattler
    • Stopping a mealy-mouthed pablum prattler
    • Dive down on these narratives
    • Dive down do the research
    • Do the tough digging that needs to be done to tell the truth
    • Carter Page being presented as a victim is ridiculous
    • George Papadopolis being presented as some kind of--oh just somebody who flew Deus Ex Machina into the Trump campaign is ridiculous
    • For whom does the Bell toll? For whom does the Bell toll it tolls for thee right--I can't remember that poem I can't remember that poem
    • Right now who wrote it anyway my point being that you need to dig this isn't the
    • The responsibility of the Fourth Estate isn't one of a mealy-mouthed prattler
    • A mealy-mouthed prattler is not good enough
    • OANN digs, other networks dig
    • It's time now to stop being a mealy-mouthed prattler and dig
  • Day 112.8. A Prayer For Our Country Tonight - YouTube
    • Day 112 part 8
    • And I just wanted to say it was John Donne do oh and he For Whom the Bell Tolls it tolls for thee
    • I hope the Senators Souls raise themselves to the
    • So the majesty of this Capitol tonight
    • And hopefully we we get a deal
    • We get beyond this--CR 2 CR 2 CR
    • And create some stability and
    • And we do a deal for the dreamers
    • We get--to 2 million whatever the number is
    • But with vetting
    • Michael McMahon with vetting
    • We need vetting
    • So that's my prayer for Washington tonight
    • And may all the Senators do the best they can for our country
  • Day 113.1 - Kamilla's Fake Navy Mason Cops With DEA Licenses - YouTube
    • Day one thirteen big day memo day
    • Just a quick review of yesterday it's in cars remember the Uranium is in cars that's going to be down at the Navy Yard real close to where that Democratic National Committee high-speed line is
    • I think the Dukes are going to be the key to this story, all the way through, these dukes of nuclear hazard
    • I'm talking about Anthony Weiner, and Cheryl Mills, and it's going to be the Mueller, McCabe, Comey, Rosenstein bunch--all that bunch
    • The idea that mixed fuel Uranium and plutonium would come into the United States from Russia beginning in 1998, to a company called U.S. Enrichment, which the Dukes which the Dukes all put together with their hand-picked person that they put in there called the Kroupniks, and have Saipov truckers, truck it all around
    • The idea that none of that would be diverted, especially when you could create, and use a plant created in Canada called a CANDU reactor, to move and create and build these plants in China, over in Iran, as well as Pakistan, India, UAE, Saudi Arabia, and you could divert that fuel there and make money rather than storing it and down blending it that's almost a waste product the fact that we did that and let that happen is a mockery on the taxpayers of the United States, as also we were gonna build a MOX plant down there, to burn this fuel
    • 30 billion dollars was spent
    • It's only 30 percent complete
    • Did that money go to these different power stations around the world?
    • I think it did
    • Uranium One is a big story it's gonna get bigger
    • So I'll talk about the Navy Yard here in a second
    • This weird police force--this story from a year ago, which is Kamala Harris's guiding keel is her assistant works with these 33 fake police forces in 33 different states
    • Are those of 33 Blackberries? We'll find out
    • We'll drill in a little bit more in the Naval Observatory
    • And then finally with Edmund Burke here saying the famous statement not Wilberforce
    • Wilberforce moved out slavery--he was a contemporary of Edmund Burke, but Edmund Burke gets credit for the Fourth Estate
    • So quickly moving to [Brandon Kiel][bk2]---this is this guy Henry, David Henry who died right before this 33 state investigation could really kick off
    • And Kiel here is Kamala Harris's kind of right-hand man literally right-hand man
    • So, again, this weird police force kind of weird it's like is this the perfect cover for color-of-law operations and drugs?
    • Absolutely I think it is of course we've got Campbell's Soup here
    • Now being offered up as a in testimony Uranium One we're still not getting to the key question of the day
    • And then I'll just go here to this weird Masonic Police Force
    • They even had their own badges
    • They even had their own weird badges
    • And of course all the heraldry and costuming that you would expect a Navy Masonic order to have
    • Quickly will move toward the Navy observatory here in little circle on the Navy observatory remember this is the eye of G.O.D.
    • You can see not only ship traffic all over the world all the different navies of the world, but also air traffic
    • You've got also foot traffic now, with some of these nano satellites
    • Here's your british embassy here's Craig Marie getting that hard drive for the DNC emails, right, and through the fence
    • And then of course you have Hillary's address here at 3067 White Haven
    • Very close
    • If you were working with somebody like, oh let's say a spy named Christopher Steelee, that would be convenient to be so close to the British Embassy
    • And then of course it's just a half mile walk over here to Wisconsin Avenue, where Carter Page lives
    • Now he lives suspiciously also close to the China China China Embassy, where you get the visas
    • He worked in San Diego
    • Is this the dragon distillery connection?
    • Is this the quad connection with Bannon?
    • Did he work with Bannon at the Pentagon?
    • None of this stuff is coming out yet, so it'd be interesting how this goes
    • Let's talked about another Navy location now down here at the Naval sea command system
    • This is the operational command
    • This is the Chief of Naval Operations and across the street of course we have the high speed line on fibre to the Democratic National Committee
    • Of course we've got the rail abbas cabs over here with--choose your cab, and a nice cover where we can meet somebody in a ball park with thousands and thousands of people
    • We ever get in trouble, we can go over the bridge here to Anacostia DHS--we're safe
    • We can take a helicopter over to Ocean City Maryland
    • And then fly down to Florida
    • And then get a jet anywhere where the FIVEEYES can take us
    • In New Zealand or Australia or else Canada or the UK, and we can still continue operations there
    • Do I think Imran worked here instead of downtown?
    • Yes I do, because the Rao Abbas cabs getting people started
    • Bringing them in in an infiltration program--or let's call it a paperclip operation--would be key to be near all this stuff
    • (sorry about that)
    • So anyway I'll just move on to the FISA, which is the last big story today
    • Over a year ago this is this is March 1st last year I talked about them getting a June warrant, because I saw--the the whole press leaks the press leaks
    • I didn't know that time about Papadopoulos, but the press leaks were happening in June
    • So I said if they are going to get have a color-of-law to cover this thing, you're gonna have to have a warrant in June
    • And I believed that there was a FISA court that met
    • But I saw their their time when they don't meet very often around July 12th
    • And I surmised that they tried to go to the FISA Court to overrule, maybe it would got rejected, and then they went to the FISA Court to get it approved
    • Or the other way around
    • Maybe it was rejected or maybe was approved and then it was overturned, later overturned
    • Probably was rejected first by Rudy, and then in June, and then they overturned that and approved it in July, since all three of these folks are Clinton appointees
    • But we'll see but
    • Here I was but so I still believe that signing July then goes to October, then goes to if it fits the timing better, and I still think that there was a FISA Court of review if Rudy Judge Rudy Contreras shot blocked the first FISA, which I think is the case
    • So that sets up today for the big memo the Schiff memo
    • We'll see what happens
    • And that is your morning report
  • Day 113.2 Navy Mason Fake Cops With DEA Licenses Got Their Blackberries at InterAmerican - YouTube
    • It's day 113 this is part 2
    • And sometimes all you have to do is put two stories together this story I did about 50 days ago in front of the Navy Lodge here in Washington DC
    • Remember enter America, Inter America is the company that Imran Awan worked for at this location
    • So is Imran Awan supplying 33 secure phones--33 secure phones--not a masonic number--but 33 secure phones for these Navy fake cops in these 33 states?
    • These Navy fake mason cops
    • I mean there they are there's the badge
    • I didn't make this up
    • So now I've seen my sister of color
    • I've seen my sister of color Maxine Waters associated with Mr. Henry Grand Wizard Henry here
    • I just want to say right now as a Cherokee, I totally want to defend my sister of color as being abused in this situation
    • She's obviously been tricked, hoodwinked, otherwise fooled by these grand Wizards of [whatever]
    • They they kind of I don't really think these are the same two people he does the beards not as big but maybe that is the same guy,
    • But anyway they died conveniently before these trials
    • Interestingly enough we were at the Capitol yesterday and Inter America was demonstrating all kinds of products--all kinds of food products inside, as well there's there being a lot of dreamers at inside the Rayburn office building yesterday
    • And I thought "wow what a great way to bring stuff into America"
    • Enter America through the food products, as I've said many many many times
    • So you can go back to me being in front of this Navy Lodge, I think all the way back a hundred and fifty days, probably further back
    • But this is where I think this is the Technology Center
    • This is where they're getting the people who are running the food products in and out
    • And I think it's gonna be a lot of different Inter-America products
    • But the people running them in and out of the United States are using Imran's Blackberries in these 33 states
    • We just find out what 33 states the Grand Wizard here is overseeing, I think you're going to find the answer
    • I think one of them is San Francisco, unfortunately
    • One of them is Nancy Pelosi's district
    • Even though this is the Los Angeles Times story and they were operating out of Chinatown Becerra's old place, I think they're also operating out of the Mission District in San Francisco and the the Navy Yard, down by the Embarcadero, where Kate Steinle was killed
    • I believe is one of the key entry points as well as across the bay in Oakland is another key entry point
    • And I believe we're gonna find the Masons are Masons there with Anthony Weiner's trusted staff's BlackBerry's there as well
  • Day 113.3 House of Russian Cards Collapsing - "Rich Kids" Scatter - YouTube
    • It's day 113 part 3 and the new face involved here is going to be this guy named Oleg Deripaska
    • Just think about a pasta like a seafood linguini Podesta pasta, daring you
    • Getting up and or maybe pointing a derringer at you the little pasta jumps up off the plate points a derringer at you
    • And then you'll never forget Oleg Deripaska
    • Why is he important? Because he's sort of a second generation from this Marc Rich generation
    • Marc Rich made a deal celled sold out Russia, basically
    • All the mineral wealth--he sold out Russia
    • And there was a episode I did a while back a long time ago 450 days ago--it was of a journalist sitting in the hotel I believe was the Moscow Hilton watching the White House in Moscow, being hit with shells, and them trying to do as many deals as they could with all the metals and mining in Russia
    • And I believe it was Boris Yeltsin's son-in-law
    • And I believe all like Deripaska knows that son-in-law pretty well
    • So Oleg got the aluminum company
    • But it was really all about a company called Glencore and I'll get there in a second
    • But now you've seen this come out or like Deripaska come out into this new controversy that we have with Mark Warner Senator Mark Warner
    • With Mark Warner trying to set up a meeting between Oleg Deripaska and also Mark Warner
    • So if you don't remember Oleg Deripaska he different Strzok for different folks
    • He's Andy McCabe's lifelong friend
    • Everywhere and he seemed to be here was Oleg Deripaska
    • This is a great article by by Thomas Paine last year, talking about how these Case Files wherever Oleg Deripaska was is where Andy McCabe was gonna find Andy McCabe has been involved Uranium One especially since 1998 every step along the way with Oleg Deripaska every step along the way
    • Read this article it's a great article
    • So if you haven't heard about the Mark Warner this is what Mark Warner looks like right there
    • He is trying to do a back-channel secret meeting with for Steele and an intermediary for this Russian oligarch
    • Now for some reason theHill does not name the Russian oligarch, which is Oleg Deripaska
    • And that is the the key thing here is "hey we got to get this story straight"
    • We got to somehow turn this around, get it back onto Trump, get it off of us
    • Somehow, some way, Mark Rubio thinks this back-channel type communication, in the midst of the embroiler that we're currently in, with trying to overthrow the president, is somehow a good idea--to defend this kind of ex-parte communication, which is highly suspect in the least
    • But as I said it all leads back to Glencore
    • Glencore buys Oleg Deripaska's company
    • Basically what they do is they shard it into many little companies
    • And then they bring them all back into Glencore
    • If you don't remember, Glencore was started by Marc Rich in 1990 or 1974
    • Long long history with the Clintons 44 years now
    • Again, as I said, this is all just oh yeah the Iran-Contra it's just now Awan-Contra they're the same to me now
    • So anyway metals and mining metals and mining metals and mining
    • That's what it is about
    • And all you have to do is go down to countries that we've learned about through Mark Lambert
    • Oh here's the Mopani mines that Glencore's in
    • I wonder if Mark Lambert's gonna be near the Malpani mine?
    • Oh Democratic Republic of Congo
    • I wonder if they're going to be near the Shinkolobwe mine?
    • Copper here--there's also going to be Uranium as Katanga down here in the Katanga province, right?
    • what they did is they took all these metal and mining information that the Russians had, and they just they just stole it!
    • I mean not stole it, but bought it for pennies on the dollar
    • I was actually in Czechoslovakia in 1989 while this is all going on
    • I witnessed it firsthand
    • A lot of it was being sold through Czechoslovakia at the time
    • Western Sahara, where have we heard that before? For the mining there, for the phosphate
    • And then of course these paradise papers came out
    • This isn't the Panama papers, but look at this guy named Dan Gertler, who was making all of these deals in Congo
    • And if you remember OFAC which is the overseas company overseas part of the Treasury Department, that seizes assets
    • Dan Gertler was one of the seven that was recently I think it was November December hit with sanctions
    • So this is all coming together
    • This is why the Rothschilds are selling too, because the Rothschilds are involved in this as well
    • And they don't want to lose their assets
    • They're gonna get it into Bitcoin as fast as possible
    • So this is really collapsing
    • I believe this guy Laufman who just left
    • And then I heard another aide outside of Reibeci just left of the FBI
    • This is collapsing so fast, it's hard to keep up with
    • It but we'll see where it goes Laufman would be great to get an interview
    • Somebody should enter on the internet should do a long-form interview with Laufman
    • Anybody who knows how to get a hold of Laufman, we'd love to interview them as well
    • You don't know where to start
    • Everything is collapsing so quickly, but we're gonna try
    • But it's all going to come back to Marc Rich
    • As we've said, Awan-Contra, Iran-Contra same thing
submitted by 911bodysnatchers322 to TruthLeaks [link] [comments]

Open thread, August 2017

This is an open thread to discuss items of interest. I may also use it to drop thoughts as they occur to me as well -- something of a replacement of my former "tab closure" posts, as ... well, it seems tabs are simply running away from me. Consider this an experiment that's been mulling for some time.
If you've got a question, observation, link, or anything else, feel free to post it, with a thought to the lair rules -- like house rules, but larrier.
An evolving conversation....

Kafka as Epistemist

From "The Kafkaesque Process of Cancer Diagnosis", the concept applied here to cancer diagnosis, and in Kafka's The Trial to a process of judgement, strikes me as profoundly epistemological:
The patient continued, “You understand that the many tests and the elusive information of the recent weeks remind me of Franz Kafka's words in his famous work Der Prozess, meaning both trial and process.” “The verdict does not come suddenly, proceedings continue until a verdict is reached gradually.”

I am looking for tools to make sense of HTML DOMs

Probably in Python, though other general scripting, or possibly, compiled languages, might work. Javascript is another possibility, with a few extant tools employing this.
The primary goal is to extract document metadata (title, author, publisher, date, URL), and include the body of a document whilst excluding, or at the very least marking as secondary the ancillary bits. The though occurs that frequency / similarity analysis of the constant bits might help.
The extant tools of Readability's parser (it's survived the fall of the service), Pocket, Instapaper, Outline, etc., may be useful.
Inquiries elsewhere have also brought up Pilgrim, a project of the Knight Foundation (as Outline may also be), which isn't exactly what I'm looking for, but it's interesting in its own right.

On nuclear power and safety

There's an article making the rounds, poorly argued, IMO, extolling nuclear energy. I've been heartened by the critical response it's triggered at Hacker News, including my own contribution, previously submitted at G+ on Joerg Fliege's thread, drawing comparisons to the Banqiao Dam disaster of 1975. In part:
Proponents of nuclear power assume that we can assess risks with tails not of the decade or so of Banqiao, but of 100, 1,000, 1 million years. Utterly outside the scope of any human institutions, or of the human species itself.
Our models of risks and of costs fail us....
The problems with nuclear power are massive, long-tailed, systemic and potentially existential. The same cannot be said of a wind farm or solar array. There is no significant 10,000 year threat from wind power, or solar power. We're not risking 30 - 60 km exclusion zones, on an unplanned basis, of which we've created at least four in the half-decade of significant nuclear energy applications: Hanford, Washington, Three Mile Island, Pennsyvania, Chernobyl, Ukraine, and Fukushima, Japan. And this is with a global plant of some 450 operating nuclear power plants as of 2017....
If the total experience has been, say, 500 reactors, over 50 years, or 25,000 reactor-years of experience, and we've experienced at least four major disasters, then our failure rate is 0.016%.
The global share of nuclear power generation in 2012 was about 10%.[4] Which means that without allowing for increased electrical consumption within existing or extending to developing nations, the plant count would have to increase tenfold.
Holding the reactor-year failure rate constant would mean 80 core meltdowns per century. Reducing that to the present rate of four meltdowns/century would require reducing the failure rate to 0.0008%. That's five nines, if anyone's counting.
Five nines on a process involving weather, politics, business, social upheaval, terrorism, sabotage, individual psychology, group psychology, climate, communications, response, preparedness....

"8 Lessons from 20 years of Hype Cycles"

A look at the Gartner Hype Cycle, and lessons derived therefrom:
  1. We're terrible at making predictions. Especially about the future.
  2. An alarming number of technology trends are flashes in the pan.
  3. Lots of technologies just die. Period.
  4. The technical insight is often correct, but the implementation isn't there
  5. We've been working on a few core technical problems for decades
  6. Some technologies keep receding into the future
  7. Lots of technologies make progress when no-one is looking
  8. Many major technologies flew under the Hype Cycle radar
Michael Mullany, "8 Lessons from 20 Years of Hype Cycles".

David Gerard at the Financial Times on Bitcoin and Blockchain

David Gerard, author of Attack of the 50 Foot Blockchain, interviewed by Izabella Kaminska about Bitcoin, /Buttcoin, and Tulips, among other topics. There's a bunch of great information in this podcast, of which I'll highlight two items in particular.
I've been reflecting a great deal on information, truth, and that boundary between information and belief, most principally trust. Gerard nails the value proposition of trust, and a problem with the Free All the Things trope of decentralisation:
Decentralisation is the paramount feature in bitcoin, but it turns out that that's a bad idea that's really, really expensive, because it turns out that a tiny bit of trust saves you a fortune.
"Decentralised" isn't a useful buzzword in a lot of ways, because it turns out that you want to be a part of society.
He also points at the invalidity of market capitalisation as a concept. It's an arithmetically inexpensive value to obtain (multiply total quantity by present price), but, especially in the thin markets typical of Bitcoin, it is essentially a fantasy value with no real meaning. From a conversation at The Other Place:
[C]rypto "market cap" is a meaningless number. Even on Bitcoin, the most popular one, about 100 BTC will clear the order book on any exchange. Crypto "market cap" is not a number you could realise, it's not how much money went into it, it's not anything useful. If you want to compare cryptos by interest, you'd need to measure daily trading volumes, which is a harder number to gather, and market cap doesn't turn out to be a good proxy for it. So billions of dollars in free money weren't actually just created - instead it's millions of tokens that may or may not be tradeable for ordinary bitcoins or for cash, if you don't go very fast at all.
This evokes my own explorations of cost, price, and value, and what exactly they mean.
One analogy that Gerard, Alex Kudlick, and I are leaning toward is that of electric circuits. Price is analogous to pressure, or potential (voltage). Volume would be current. This raises the question of what resistance, capacitance, and impedance would have as analogues....
FT: Attack of the 50 Foot Blockchain with David Gerard (Soundcloud: 65 minutes). Highly recommended.
And you'll find Gerard on Reddit as dgerard.

Yonatan Zunger on the evolution of U.S. "court costs"

In "The history of “court costs”", Zunger writes of "a system that [you might think] has gone out of control, a mechanism that started with a good purpose that got eaten by corruption and incompetence. But you would be wrong."
In the post-Civil War South, a system came up when plantations, factories, or mines needed workers. It was based on that clever little exception in the 13th Amendment:
Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.
Note that it doesn’t say what kind of crime you have to be convicted of.
The short of it: slavery is not illegal in the United States, just somewhat regulated.
My own main commentary ... probably worth posting in its own right, is that whilst Zunger raises excellent points about the intentionality of this system and its antecedents to Nazi Germany's concentration camps, the fact is that none of these phenomena are particularly American, nor particularly new. This isn't to excuse the United States of its guilt.
Rather: these behaviours, systems, and dynamics seem to be deeply rooted. Whether they're merely cultural (the examples I've given are all from cultural antecedants or siblings to US tradition), part of human behavioral psychology, or deeper even than that, this is not simply a matter of bad laws and bad people. Rather: It is a case of such rules and dynamics actively succeeding and crowding out alternatives.
There are two good discussions at The Other Place from the original Tootstorm and from the Medium essay.

When your political opponents are made of money ...

In politics, a growing problem is the dominance of interests who apparently have nothing but money to throw at problems
Utilising this fact in judo fashion, the thought occurs that that one possible response is to create a vast wall of problems for which they find it necessary to throw money at.
The less ease with which to discern between actual problems and fantasmic simaculra of problems, so much the better.
Have fun storming the castle!

Bill Browder: "It turned out that in Putin's Russia, there are no good guys."

At NPR: "Businessman Paints Terrifying And Complex Picture Of Putin's Russia:
In what one senator called one of the Senate Judiciary Committee's "most important" hearings, [William] Browder, a wealthy businessman-turned-activist-turned Putin-adversary shed a chilling new light on a Russian system of government that operates ruthlessly in the shadows — as Browder described it for lawmakers: a "kleptocracy" sustained by corruption, blackmail, torture and murder with Putin at its center.
"Effectively the moment that you enter into their world," Browder told senators investigating Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, "you become theirs."
Oh, and "Russian adoptions" are one of the dog whistles for the Magnitsky Act, legislation passed in the U.S. in 2012, named after Browder's now-murdered Russian lawyer, Sergei Magnitski, imposing sanctions on human-rights violators.
Also the topic of a certain July, 2016 meeting featuring Donald Trump, Jr., and senior members of the Trump campaign, of recent memory.

The distinction isn't "online vs. offline" but "direct vs. mediated"

Articles and books on the impacts of digital and mobile media are a dime a dozen, and may be as laughable, or prophetic, as previous gerimiads on new media. "Has the Smartphone Destroyed a Generation" is fairly typical of the genre, if better than most.
Reading it, a thought recurs to me: the distinction isn't of online vs. offline, but or even screen time, but of mediated vs. direct experience.
Media mediates. It is literally that which is between the observer and the observed. And with increasingly smart media, those exchanges are very directly mediated, interposed, by third (and fourth, and fifth, and ...) parties.
This has multiple effects, a few:
I'd argue there are degrees of mediation as well. Analogue devices such as the telephone are less mediated than digital feeds such as Facebook or YouTube.
And this isn't the first period to have such experiences. I have frequent cause to point out that intellectual, academic, and creative experiences were very often epistolary, exchanges of letters. Though generally with less rapidity than today's 'round-the-world-in-a-second emails.
But that whole "online" and "cyberspace" distinction? Lose it.

The etymology of "data" ... peculiarly uninformative

I'm rather the fan of looking at etymologies of words. They often reveal interesting origins, connections, or evolutions. The etymology of data would be a peculiar exception:
1640s, classical plural of datum, from Latin datum "(thing) given," neuter past participle of dare "to give" (from PIE root *do- "to give"). Meaning "transmittable and storable computer information" first recorded 1946. Data processing is from 1954.
By way of definitions:
a collection of facts, observations, or other information related to a particular question or problem; as, the historical data show that the budget deficit is only a small factor in determining interest rates.
Which raises the question of whether data is the collection of facts, or the symbolic or other representation of those facts.
Arising as discovered that there is a philosophy of data and I've encountered its philosopher, Brian Ballsun-Stanton (via Mastodon).

Amathia: Unteachably stupid

There are a few concepts on the harm or danger of stupidity. In "One Crucial Word", Massimo Pigliucci explores the Greek term Amathia:
Amathia. It is often translated as “ignorance,” as in the following two famous quotes from Socrates:
“Wisdom alone, is the good for man, ignorance the only evil” (Euthydemus 281d)
“There is, he said, only one good, that is, knowledge, and only one evil, that is, ignorance” (in Diogenes Laertius, II.31)
But just as in the case of other ancient Greek words (like “eudaimonia,” about which I will write later this week) the common translation hardly does the job, and indeed often leads people to misunderstand the concept and quickly dismiss it as “obviously” false, or even incoherent....
Very much worth reading. Via /Philosophy and Paul Beard.

I've made good on a year-old threat and opened up Miranda's Knitting and Tea House

Enjoy! Welcome to the Tea House: Knitting. Tea. Discussion. Intelligence. Sunshine. "We Do Things Different"tm .
This is a sibling subreddit, with more open submissions, though still in a controlled manner. More at the notice.

Dietrich Bonhoeffer on stupidity vs. evil

From The Other Place: Stupidity is a more dangerous enemy of the good than malice:
Stupidity is a more dangerous enemy of the good than malice. One may protest against evil; it can be exposed and, if need be, prevented by use of force. Evil always carries within itself the germ of its own subversion in that it leaves behind in human beings at least a sense of unease. Against stupidity we are defenseless. Neither protests nor the use of force accomplish anything here; reasons fall on deaf ears; facts that contradict one’s prejudgment simply need not be believed- in such moments the stupid person even becomes critical – and when facts are irrefutable they are just pushed aside as inconsequential, as incidental. In all this the stupid person, in contrast to the malicious one, is utterly self-satisfied and, being easily irritated, becomes dangerous by going on the attack. For that reason, greater caution is called for than with a malicious one. Never again will we try to persuade the stupid person with reasons, for it is senseless and dangerous....
Read through to the source for the full quote.
I've dug a bit deeper into the backstory. Dietrich Bonhoeffer was a contemporary and friend of Reinhold Neibur, of "Serenity Prayer" fame. He served in the Abwehr, the Nazi intelligence service, during WWII, headed by Wilhelm Canaris. Bonhoeffer and Caneris were executed by the Nazi regime on 9 April, 1945, only three weeks before the fall of Berlin and Hitler's own death. And it turns out that the Abwehr, centre of relatively unfiltered information during the regime, was an active centre of resistance to it, from within.
Bonhoeffer was one of eight children. A brother, and the husbands of two of his sisters, were also executed by the Nazi regime. Bonhoeffer's twin sister Sabine survived until 1999.
Strongly related to the previous item on amathia, and observations from Hanah Arendt.

The Edge Question, 2017

"What Scientific Term or Concept Ought to be More Widely Known?" I find The Edge to be a bit hit-or-miss, and there are some misses here. But there's a heck of a lot of hits on topics that have been floating through my brain-space, and a few names I've been following as well. David Christian ("Big History"), confirmation bias, motivated reasoning, networks, information pathology, ... Daily Nous has a promising list as well. I've got the essays lined up to ... hopefully, read. And this note as a reminder to do that.

John Stuart Mill: A Few Words on Non-Intervention

By way of Wikipedia:
There seems to be no little need that the whole doctrine of non-interference with foreign nations should be reconsidered, if it can be said to have as yet been considered as a really moral question at all... To go to war for an idea, if the war is aggressive, not defensive, is as criminal as to go to war for territory or revenue; for it is as little justifiable to force our ideas on other people, as to compel them to submit to our will in any other respect. But there assuredly are cases in which it is allowable to go to war, without having been ourselves attacked, or threatened with attack; and it is very important that nations should make up their minds in time, as to what these cases are... To suppose that the same international customs, and the same rules of international morality, can obtain between one civilized nation and another, and between civilized nations and barbarians, is a grave error...

Oil is other people's money

I was thinking through the history of the Indiana natural gas boom -- oh, yeah, what Indiana gas boom, you ask? This Indiana gas boom, lasting from about 1884 to 1903. Basically, people realised you could stick a pipe in the ground and burn what came out. Which people did. As free-standing, natural-wonder flambeaux -- flaming torches, visible for miles around. After all, such a God-given abundance would surely last forever, right?
The field burned out, literally, in two decades.
But why waste that resource? I'm thinking of a typical Analyst's Matrix, describing spending your own, vs. other people's money. Let's do that in a table:
Your money Someone else's money
Your use High quality / Low cost High quality / Cost irrelevant
Somebody else's use Quality irrelevant / Low cost Quality irrelevant / Cost irrelevant
When it comes to natural gas, or oil, or coal, the majority of the cost, that is, its initial formation is not borne by you. Only the extraction cost is. That un-borne fraction is effectively other people's money. You care about the quality of the use (its use value), but not the full formation cost.
Oil, coal, and gas, are other people's money.
The legacy of the Indiana boom lives on in a few ways. Ball Glass Company originally formed in the state to take advantage of cheap gas for glass blowing, as did numerous other manufacturing concerns. They eventually shifted to coal. And you'll find the word flambeau turning up in place-names and the odd company name to. Relics to other people's money.

Limitations on Free Speech -- revisiting "shouting 'No Fire!' in a theatre that is in fact on fire"

The dynamics since the American Fascists riots in Charlottesville, VA, and the ACLU reconsidering its position on free speech reminds me that I had started, quite uncomfortably, revisiting my own views on this about three years ago. "Shouting "No Fire" in a Warming World as a Clear and Present Danger" was my thinking at the time.
Further developments -- Charlie Hebdo attacks, "punching vs. punching down", questions over revisionist history, the amazingly good two-part YouTube set by Contrapoints: "Does the Left Hate Free Speech? (Part 1)" (video: 16:53) and "Does the Left Hate Free Speech? (Part 2)" (video: 17:46) (I'm surprised I hadn't already mentioned it), various research (Jill Gordon, "John Stuart Mill and 'The Marketplace of Ideas'" and Jill Lepore (Kansas City Public Library lecture) both address parts of this. Karl Popper's "Paradox of Tolerance". Many, many discussions, mostly on G+.
The history of free expression / free speech itself is interesting and surprising, particularly the role between Protestant and Catholic factions -- the latter being seen much the same way as Fascists are today, as constitutionally opposed to tolerance, and therefore not subject to the benefits of free speech themselves.

Jeff Schmidt on salaried professionals and the soul-battering system that shapes their lives

Disciplined Minds by physicist Jeff Schmidt has been in my files for a while. Per Unwelcomed Guests Wiki:
This book explains the social agenda of the process of professional training. Disciplined Minds shows how it is used to promote orthodoxy by detecting and weeding out dissident candidates and by exerting pressure on the rest to obey their instructors and abandon personal agendas such as social reform -- so that they, in turn, can perpetuate the system by squeezing the life out of the next generation.
This ... is strikingly similar to the critique of John Stuart Mill of England's educational systems in the 1860s. Hans Jensen addresses this in "John Stuart Mill's Theories of Wealth and Income Distribution" (available via Sci-Hub).
Several prior Reddit mentions.

So no, Sonos! Palindromic boycott of privacy-skewering IoT ToS change

Wireless, cloud-connected speaker manufacturer Sonos have retroactively changed terms of service and required existing product owners monitoring subjects accept the new terms or the devices will cease to function.
And this, boys and girls, is why you don't buy Sonos products, ever.
(Or any Internet of Things that Spy On You devices.)
Palindrome courtesey Sakari Maaranen.

Alexander Hamilton Church and cost accounting: Capital-Labour analysis

Alexander Hamilton Church (28 May 1866 – 11 February 1936) was an English efficiency engineer, accountant and writer on accountancy and management, known for his seminal work of management and cost accounting. In particular, it was his work which expanded the concept of factors of production from just labour to include capital and other inputs.
Among his works, Production factors in cost accounting and works management (1910), from whose introduction:
From the earliest days of manufacturing there has grown up a custom of considering labor as the main and only direct item in production, and of expressing all other expenditure in more or less vague percentages of wage cost. The fact is, however, that labor, while always important, tends to become less important relatively to other items as the progress of organized manufacture develops and the use of specialized and expensive mechanical equipment increases. Very few concerns have come to grief by ignoring labor costs, but many have passed into the hands of receivers by ignoring the relative imiportance of the other factors of production.

On social media and online tools as "optional": Facebook required for AirBnB

Via The Guardian, "I didn’t have enough Facebook friends to prove to Airbnb I was real":
At the other end of the Airbnb helpline in Colorado, “Casey” sounded incredulous. “You have how many Facebook friends?” she drawled. “Er … about 50,” I replied. Long pause. “Well, you don’t have enough for us to verify you. You’d need at least 100.”
“But”, I squeaked, “I post every now and again … I’m on Facebook most days to check on my friends and relations.” This, however, was not enough to convince Airbnb I existed. And, as I didn’t exist, I could not book a room.
Keep this in mind next time someone declares "nobody forces you to use Facebook". Despite the many other refutations of this trope, we can now respond unequivocally: "AirBnB do".

Milestones: the 900 club

Just to memorialise this, and to bury the item as I close out this thread: the Dreddit has crossed the 900 subscriber threshold for the first time. Thanks to all, again, I will strive to be worth your time. It's interesting how much I prefer not to note such things, and yet do in fact note them. The days of teetering just on the edge in particular.

Previously:

One last thing ...

Do you like what you're reading here? Would you like to see a broader discussion? Do you think there are ideas which should be shared more broadly?
The Lair isn't a numbers game, my real goal is quality -- reaching, and hopefully interacting with, an intelligent online community. Something which I've found, in several decades of online interactions, difficult to achieve.
But there's something which works surprisingly well: word of mouth. Shares, by others, to appropriate venues, have generated the best interactions. I do some of that, but I could use your help as well.
So: if you see something that strikes you as particularly cogent (or, perhaps, insipid), please share it. To another subreddit. To Twitter or Facebook or G+. To the small-but-high-quality Metafilter. To your blogging circle, or a mailing list. If you work in technology, or policy, or economics, there as well.
Thanks, Morbius.
submitted by dredmorbius to dredmorbius [link] [comments]

Weekly Roundup

News roundup for the previous week.
In International news
  1. Unstable Geopolitics, Pakistan’s Alliance with China: Trump’s Backlash against Pakistan Reveals the Dawn of a Disputed 2018 Year
  2. American Girl, 16, charged with killing 74-year-old Chinese grandpa as he took out trash
  3. President Macron calls for French-China cooperation on Silk Road, climate
  4. Macron vows active participation in Belt and Road initiative
  5. A dominant Nathan Chen cruised to a repeat U.S. Figure Skating Championship title in San Jose. Vincent Zhou grabbed the bronze medal with 273.83 points
  6. S. Korea seeks deeper cooperation with China, Japan in regulating cryptocurrencies
  7. Xi calls for deeper cooperation with Britain under Belt & Road Initiative
  8. China donates prefabricated houses for displaced people in #Myanmar's Rakhine state
  9. China: U.S. should curb demand for opioids, not blame us
  10. China key partner for #Cambodia in infrastructure development: Cambodian officials. "More than 2,000 km of roads, seven large bridges, and a new container terminal of the Phnom Penh Autonomous Port have been constructed under China's aid," Chanthol said
  11. Tariffs to be slashed in 2018 as China-Chile free trade agreement kicks in: Nearly 98 percent of products traded between China and #Chile will have zero tariffs attached when the new China-Chile free trade agreement is implemented in 2018
  12. UN chief lauds G77 and China's role in multilateralism, climate action
  13. Canada takes U.S. to WTO, U.S. says case helps China: Canada has launched a wide-ranging trade complaint against the United States, in a dispute that Washington said would damage Canada’s own interests and play into China’s hands
In Domestic news
  1. China keeps its promises, the country's anti-poverty drive is transforming the lives of rural communities by leaps
  2. High-speed rail network to cover 80% of major cities in China by 2020: total length of track capable of supporting high-speed trains will reach 38,000 kilometres by 2025 and 45,000 kilometres by 2030
  3. China's future cities will focus on sustainability, connectivity, and mobility.
  4. Second China-made C919 jet completes first trial flight
  5. 26 pct Chinese university students eager to start businesses: survey
  6. Chinese internet regulators scold Alibaba's Ant Financial for violating customer privacy through Sesame Credit
  7. Chinese Kids Who Eat Fish Every Week Have Higher IQs and Better Sleep, Study Says
  8. Chinese City Opens Up Spectacular 'Ice City' for International Snow Festival
  9. China is seeing signs of success in its fight against smog as pollution levels slump dramatically in the capital region Beijing.
  10. Marriott: China blocks website and app over description of Tibet and Taiwan
  11. Chinese Police Dynamite Christian Megachurch
  12. China to Plant New Forests the Size of Ireland This Year
  13. China cracks down on foreign companies calling Taiwan, other regions countries: The involvment of more than one Chinese authority in rebuking businesses across different industries suggested possible coordination at a high level of government
In SciTech news
  1. Asian-Chinese Engineering at work | How high speed railway tunnels are built
  2. GoPro quits the drone business (Got Nuked by China's DJI)
  3. China emerges as a hotbed for artificial intelligence: “We saw lots of interest in #AI in China, and the sector is moving so fast in the country” said Nicholson, CEO of Skymind. “China is home to many of the world’s top experts in AI and machine learning” wrote Fei-Fei Li, chief scientist for Google
  4. Beijing to break ground on new #AI science park this year: It will house about 400 enterprises after completion with an estimated annual output value of 50 billion yuan. Industries there will include ultra-high-speed big data, cloud computing, bio-metric identification and deep learning
  5. [Huawei’s CEO going off-script to rage at US carriers was the best speech of CES x-post
  6. How Huawei Can Break Apple and Samsung's Smartphone Grip
  7. Beijing to Pave Way for Autonomous Driving With New Test Road: The new testing road will pilot changes designed to make roads more easily recognizable to artificial intelligence
  8. DJI announced new $99 drone Tello. Why? Tello is only 80 grams, which means owners don't have to register their Tello (FAA require registration of all drones over 250 grams)
  9. A team of researchers with Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing Tech University and Northwestern Polytechnical University, all in China, has developed a new type of paper that can be erased and printed on multiple times.
  10. Ford CEO: China Will Take the Lead in Electric Vehicle Area
  11. Central China city to build 80,000 charging piles for electric cars
  12. China budgets over 13 bln yuan for major research programs in 2018: The programs consist of 40 special projects and more than 600 minor projects, covering four major fields including social development, high-tech research, agricultural science and technology, and fundamental research
  13. Google and Intel Beware: China Is Gunning for Dominance in #AI Chips. Buckets of money are available for the industry. With more than 750 million people online, China provides plenty of consumers and data for companies to use. AI chip competitors enjoy state support
  14. How This China Tech Company Is About To Change Everything You Know About VR
  15. #CES becomes the Chinese electronics show as Shenzhen, Dongguan exhibitors throng fair: As many as 1,551 Chinese companies registered to display their products and software applications in Las Vegas this week, out of a record turnout of 4,500 exhibitors
In Economic news
  1. Foreign Brands Have ‘Princess Syndrome,’ Says People’s Daily
  2. Iran Sanctions Will Help China's Petro-Yuan
  3. China on the verge of bursting bitcoin bubble
  4. China, the Innovation Dragon. Given its own policies, and those of the US, China is on track to become the world’s innovation leader. By the end of 2018, it will likely be apparent to all just how quickly and easily this latest chapter in the Chinese success story will be written.
  5. "Political pressure" reportedly kills Huawei/AT&T smartphone deal
  6. China Weighs Slowing or Halting Purchases of U.S. Treasuries
  7. China is reportedly thinking of halting US Treasury purchases and that's worrying markets
  8. China FX regulator: report on slowing US bond buying based on fake news
  9. Chinese Workers Abandon Silicon Valley for Riches Back Home
  10. The Cashless Society Has Arrived— Only It’s in China: Though the U.S. saw $112 billion of mobile payments in 2016, by a Forrester Research estimate, such payments in China totaled $9 trillion
  11. China just reminded the United States that Beijing is its banker
  12. Russian-Chinese trade up 20.8% in 2017, to $84.07 bln
  13. China would win in a trade war with U.S., analyst says
  14. The rise of the petro-yuan
  15. #Marriott apologizes for labeling China's territories as independent: CEO apologized for listing Tibet, among other parts of China, as a country and promised to take measures to prevent such incidents. "Marriott International respects and supports the sovereignty and territorial integrity of China"
  16. Uncle Sam's treatment of Huawei is world-class hypocrisy – consumers will pay the price
  17. The Chinese are now buying as much stuff as Americans, a game-changer for the world economy
  18. China has become the world's 5th largest US #patent recipient, having increased the number of patents it received tenfold in less than 10 years
In Military news
  1. Retired Colonel: China Looks to Bolster Military Presence in #Pakistan. A Chinese military base in Jiwani would control the vital sea lanes in the Arabian Sea at the mouth of the Persian Gulf and provide another link in a string of potential military facilities from the South China Sea to Africa
  2. China’s Wing Loong II Killer #Drone Fires 5 Missiles in Single Sortie: After multiple rounds of flight and firing tests, the Wing Loong II UAS has conducted firing tests with eight types of missiles and dozens of bombs, with a hit rate of 100 percent
  3. PLA Navy to streamline pilot training as more aircraft carriers expected
  4. Chinese armies are now able to use #robots to fire ballistic missiles after successfully developing an automated launching system. The advanced system would help China fire warheads three times faster and halve the number of soldiers involved
  5. Jan 3rd 2018 Military Report Video
  6. Work on main battleship for China’s new-generation aircraft carrier enters home stretch: China now is building four Type 055 destroyers, with two designed to be ‘imperial bodyguards’ to the first home-grown carrier in high seas
  7. China’s hi-tech missile ambitions are marching ahead at warp speed: The DF-17 is the first missile system anywhere that uses a #hypersonic glide vehicle as its payload and is intended for operational deployment. US intelligence expecting the DF-17 to enter service around 2020
  8. Chinese armed forces start new round of training in 2018
  9. New batch of Y-20 planes to boost military transport capability: At least five Y-20 transporters went into service in the country's Western Theater Command. The Y-20 has a maximum takeoff weight of 200 tons and is ideal for transporting cargo and personnel over long distances
Other Notables
  1. China’s top 10 box office hits of all time include four domestic films released in 2017
  2. Exiled Billionaire Guo Wengui funding Steve Bannon, American Far Right
  3. “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” has stumbled in China with a mediocre $28.7 million opening weekend, marking the first real disappointment for the Disney-Lucasfilm tentpole.
  4. The Temple of Heaven - Built between 1406 – 1420, Emperors of the Ming and Qing Dynasty came here for annual prayer ceremonies for a good harvest
  5. A Chinese soldier was challenged with drifting in a tank. He needed to drive three tanks and park them in the right location. Could he complete the "impossible challenge"
  6. Guangzhou - [2048x789]
  7. A combination of heavy blows gave the Chinese fighter called “Black Leopard” a TKO win over Francisco of Spain at Kunlun fight
  8. Ancestor Worship Ceremony Held in China's New Year Celebration: #Chinese people, including overseas Chinese, attended an ancestor-worshiping ceremony to celebrate the New Year at the Mausoleum of Huangdi, or the Yellow Emperor
  9. A Good Music Video Recommended for All Fathers and Daughters 王力宏 親愛的
  10. Catchy song from Brother Hao
  11. Chinese characters from ancient times to present day
  12. Demonizing China will not deter its rise – or improve America’s. America’s apparent policy failures and declining global influence could trigger more intense criticism against China, blaming it for everything under he sun.
  13. Can Germany overcome bias against China?
  14. Godfrey Gao Says He Experienced Racism While Growing Up In Vancouver
  15. GAI - 天乾物燥 (Chinese Hip-hop blended with traditional instruments)
  16. CHINA MAC WHO I AM
  17. When America was a Developing Country, How China's current situation and mentality was like US back in the late 1800s, interesting read
  18. The Monkey King 3 film title song 西游记之女儿国 主题曲《女儿国 》 MV
  19. Post rock - 惘聞 - Lonely God
  20. Congrats!!! Newly-weds attend a group wedding ceremony at a subway station in central China's Wuhan on Wednesday. The 21 couples were involved in the construction of the subway
  21. World's largest ice festival wows tourists as illuminations light up Harbin sky
  22. Total War: THREE KINGDOMS - Announcement Cinematic
  23. Asian American writes emotional essay to Chinese parents - Do not immigrate to America, your kids will suffer.
  24. Why suburbia sucks (Why China must stop urban sprawl and stop following North American thinking about urban planning)
  25. What The Chinese Think Of Chinese Tourist Stereotypes
  26. That was fast.
  27. RAP OF TIBET CYPHER 藏族说唱 TIBET HIP HOP
  28. The Greatest Human Migration in the Recorded History of Mankind (Wealth of Nations Podcast, Ep. 13)
  29. [Traditional Instrument Music] 情蠱 The Love Spell
  30. Who was Zhou Youguang? Google celebrates linguist who developed Chinese phonetic translation
  31. 金发碧眼小洋妞的“中文十级”节日祝福
  32. Founder of pinyin featured on google's main page
  33. Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson on Chinese variety show Kuai Le Da Ben Ying
  34. Looking for some counterweight for Chinese sci-fi, specifically those with Confucian undertones
  35. Ji Cheng: The designer who wins Chinese millennial over
  36. How the word for ‘Tea' spread around the world
  37. Globaltimes: US divisions threaten leadership role
  38. 心動 - JerryC ft. Julia Wu吳卓源
  39. Commentary: Australia needs self-reflection as South Pacific Islands stand up
  40. China’s Strategy to Psych Out the West Is Paying Off
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